LINUX IS CONFUSING. THESE ARTICLES SHOULD HELP.

The vim text editor, a standard tool included on Linux and macOS, can quickly encrypt text files with a password. It’s faster and more convenient than encrypting a text file with a separate utility. Here’s how to set it up.

about 2 months ago - by  |  2 Replies

Plex Media Server is renowned for smooth and intuitive user experience, so you might be a bit surprised if you find yourself puzzled over exactly how to restart your server. Don’t worry, we’ve got you covered.

about 2 months ago - by  |  2 Replies

When you run a command at the bash prompt, it normally prints the output of that command directly to the terminal so you can read it immediately. But bash also allows you to “redirect” the output of any command, saving it to a text file so you can review the output later.

about 2 months ago - by  |  3 Replies

Google Chrome is based on Chromium, an open-source browser project. Anyone can take the Chromium source code and use it to build their own browser, renaming it and changing whatever they like. That’s why there are so many alternative browsers based on Google Chrome—but you don’t necessarily want to use most of them.

about 2 months ago - by  |  29 Replies

Chrome is Chrome, right? You download Google’s browser—now the most popular in the world—and you’d think you have the same experience as everyone else. But like most large software vendors, Google releases Chrome in differing “channels,” testing out features in more unstable versions before they get to the release build that hundreds of millions of people use every day.

about 2 months ago - by  |  11 Replies

It’s ideal to have a dedicated machine for your BitTorrent client, so you can seed 24/7. But it’s energy intensive to leave a full rig powered up and online that often. Enter the Raspberry Pi.

about 2 months ago - by  |  3 Replies

Symbolic links, also known as symlinks, are special files that point to files or directories in other locations on your system. You can think of them like advanced aliases and here’s how to use them in MacOS.

about 2 months ago - by  |  1 Reply

Bash is the default command-line shell on most Linux distributions, from Ubuntu and Debian to Red Hat and Fedora. Bash is also the default shell included with macOS, and you can install a Linux-based bash environment on Windows 10.

about 2 months ago - by  |  1 Reply

Web Proxy Auto-Discovery (WPAD) gives organizations a way to automatically configure a proxy server on your system. Windows enables this setting by default. Here’s why that’s a problem.

about 2 months ago - by  |  3 Replies

The Windows Command Prompt has a built-in history feature, allowing you to quickly view commands you’ve run in the current session. Even better, the Command Prompt offers quite a few keyboard shortcuts and other tricks for working with your command history.

about 2 months ago - by  |  1 Reply

Whether you’re formatting an internal drive, external drive, or removable drive, Windows gives you the choice of using three different file systems: NTFS, FAT32, and exFAT. The Format dialog in Windows doesn’t explain the difference, so we will.

about 2 months ago - by  |  32 Replies

Laptop manufacturers spend a lot of time tuning their device drivers for Windows battery life. Linux usually doesn’t get the same attention. Linux may perform just as well as Windows on the same hardware, but it won’t necessarily have as much battery life.

about 3 months ago - by  |  1 Reply

Once you start digging into a Linux system, you may find some confusing or unexpected things, like /usr/bin/false, for example. Why is it there and what is its purpose? Today’s SuperUser Q&A post has the answer to a curious reader’s questions.

about 3 months ago - by  |  1 Reply

Most Linux distributions include the bash shell by default, but you could also switch to another shell environment. Zsh is a particularly popular alternative, and there are other shells, like ash, dash, fish, and tcsh. But what’s the difference, and why are there so many?

about 3 months ago - by  |  3 Replies

Are you getting notifications about a full Time Machine drive? Do you feel like your backups are taking too long? A bigger, faster hard drive might be the best solution, but you can also help by excluding particular folders from your backups.

about 3 months ago - by  |  1 Reply

When formatting partitions on a Linux PC, you’ll see a wide variety of file system options. These options don’t need to be overwhelming. If you’re not sure which Linux file system to use, there’s a simple answer.

about 3 months ago - by  |  7 Replies

On the first day of 2016, Mozilla terminated support for a weakening security technology called SHA-1 in the Firefox web browser. Almost immediately, they reversed their decision, as it would cut access to some older websites. But in February 2017, their fears finally came true: researchers broke SHA-1 by creating the first real-world collision attack. Here’s what all that means.

about 3 months ago - by  |  7 Replies

If you love Microsoft’s “Ribbon” interface but prefer the free and open source LibreOffice, you can get the best of both worlds…if you’re willing to put up with an experimental feature. While not officially an alternative to the Ribbon, LibreOffice’s “Notebookbar” bears an uncanny resemblance, and it’s a big improvement on LibreOffice’s old-timey toolbars.

about 3 months ago - by  |  8 Replies

Chromebooks aren’t like traditional laptops. While they’re much simpler, they still have various useful features you may not know about. From accessing remote computers and printing to wiping your personal data, recovering Chrome OS, and installing desktop Linux, these tricks will help you get the most out of your Chromebook.

about 3 months ago - by  |  21 Replies

If you are just getting started with rsync for the first time and have multiple large hard drives to make backups of, is it safe to actually use one or more of them during the long process? Today’s SuperUser Q&A post has the answer to a worried reader’s question.

about 3 months ago - by  |  1 Reply

You’ll sometimes see MD5, SHA-1, or SHA-256 hashes displayed alongside downloads during your internet travels, but not really known what they are. These seemingly random strings of text allow you to verify files you download aren’t corrupted or tampered with. You can do this with the commands built into Windows, macOS, and Linux.

about 3 months ago - by  |  7 Replies

An SSH client connects to a Secure Shell server, which allows you to run terminal commands as if you were sitting in front of another computer. But an SSH client also allows you to “tunnel” a port between your local system and a remote SSH server.

about 3 months ago - by  |  6 Replies

You’ve been emailed a document, and you have to sign it and send it back. You could print out the document, sign it, and then scan it back in and email it. But there’s a better, faster way.

about 3 months ago - by  |  25 Replies

Since iOS 7, Apple devices have had limited support for opening ZIP files in Messages and Mail, while a few other third-party apps provide methods for opening ZIP files. But what if you’re on the other end and want to share multiple files with someone in a zipped file?

about 4 months ago - by  |  1 Reply

If you’ve done even some casual searching for digital comics online, you’ve certainly come across plenty of files with the .CBR and .CBZ file extensions. Let’s take a look at these ubiquitous comic formats, why they’re so popular, and how you can read them.

about 4 months ago - by  |  5 Replies