Should You Buy a Chromebook?

When Chromebooks first hit the scene, I’m not sure anyone could’ve predicted how popular they’d become. They’ve gone from ultra-low cost, overly-simplistic laptops to legitimate daily-use machines—they even outsold MacBooks in Q1 of 2016. The real question most people have about Chromebooks, however, is “Can I live inside Chrome?”

How to Stream From VLC to Your Chromecast

VLC’s developers have been working on Chromecast support for some time, and it’s finally here. In the latest bleeding edge Windows versions of VLC, you can stream video and audio files from VLC media player on your PC to your Chromecast.

How to Use Google Drive on Linux

When Google introduced Google Drive in April 24, 2012, they promised Linux support “coming soon.” That was nearly five years ago. Google still hasn’t released an official version of Google Drive for Linux, but there are other tools to fill the gap.

What Are Mesh Wi-Fi Systems, and How Do They Work?

If your home’s Wi-Fi network has dead spots, or doesn’t reach across your entire house, then you might have recently considered getting a mesh Wi-Fi system. They’ve skyrocketed in popularity, but what exactly is mesh Wi-Fi and how is it different than a traditional Wi-Fi extender?

7 Ways To Free Up Hard Disk Space On Windows

Hard drives are getting larger and larger, but somehow they always seem to fill up. This is even more true if you’re using a solid-state drive (SSD), which offers much less hard drive space than traditional mechanical hard drives.

How to Watch and Record Live TV with Kodi and NextPVR

A Kodi-based home theater PC is great for watching your ripped or downloaded videos, but even if you’ve cut cable from your life, there’s still a time and place for live TV–like sports. Not to mention recording shows onto a DVR. Here’s how to watch and record live TV from Kodi on Windows.

What Is a “Portable” App, and Why Does It Matter?

Portable applications offer some definite advantages over their traditional counterparts. They’re lightweight and they allow you to move between computers while taking your applications and settings with you. Here’s why they’re different and why they’re sometimes—but not always—a good choice.

How to Secure Your Accounts With a U2F Key

U2F is an emerging standard for physical authentication tokens. Current U2F keys are all small USB devices. To log in, you won’t need to enter an authentication code provided from an app or SMS—just insert the USB security key and press a button. Here’s how they work.