How to Avoid Fake and Scammy Amazon Sellers

Amazon is one of the biggest direct-to-consumer marketplaces on the planet. And not just of its own goods and services: though the company operates huge warehouses all over the world, it also lets smaller companies sell harder-to-find items on its marketplace, including individual sellers of new and used items. But with a relatively wide-open policy towards third party sellers, a few with less than noble intentions are sure to slip through the cracks. Here’s how to spot them.

The Complete Guide to Improving Android Battery Life

Once upon a time, you had to really keep an eye on your Android phone to make sure the battery wasn’t being depleted prematurely. Manually toggling connections, constantly adjusting brightness, and the like are basically all things of the past now—but there are still things you can do to maximize your handset’s battery life.

How Credit Card Skimmers Work, and How to Spot Them

A credit card skimmer is a malicious device criminals attach to a payment terminal—most commonly on ATMs and gas pumps. When you use an terminal that’s been compromised in such a way, the skimmer will create a copy of your card and capture your PIN (if it’s an ATM card).

How to Take Good Photos of the Starry Sky

The night sky is breathtaking. If you go somewhere reasonably dark and let your eyes adjust, you can look up and see thousands of pin pricks of light, each one a star or galaxy that’s millions of years old. I find it completely humbling.

What Are Planar Magnetic Headphones?

The world of audiophile hardware is dense and hard to parse… and to be perfectly honest, audiophiles seem to like it that way. Even so, a technology called “planar magnetic drivers” is making its way into cheaper and more accessible headphones as of late, promising audio fidelity much greater than conventional cans. What makes planar magnetic headphones different—and allegedly better—than normal ones? Let’s have a listen.

APFS Explained: What You Need to Know About Apple’s New File System

Apple’s macOS 10.13 High Sierra brings a new file system named “Apple File System”, which largely replaces the older HFS+ file system. Apple File System, also known as APFS, has been used by default on iPhones and iPads since iOS 10.3, and is also used on the Apple Watch and Apple TV—but now it’s finally on the Mac, too.

Why Snow, Rain, and Confetti Destroy Streaming Video Quality

If you’ve ever watched a movie on Netflix, YouTube, or some other streaming service, you might notice that any time there’s a rainy scene, the video quality completely falls apart. Even if you’re streaming over the best internet connection, the video will look like crap. This happens because all video streams are compressed, and particles like rain, snow, and confetti completely destroy compressed streams.

What Are NVIDIA MAX-Q Laptops?

If you’re looking for a new Windows-based laptop and you’re somewhat interested in performance, you might come across models that are marketed as “featuring “NVIDIA MAX-Q.” But that description is somewhat nebulous: MAX-Q isn’t a specific NVIDIA graphics card, or even a hardware feature at all. So what exactly does this description mean, and does it make a gaming-grade laptop any more desirable than a non-Q laptop?

How Safari’s New Intelligent Tracking Prevention Works

It’s one of the most discussed new features in High Sierra: Safari’s new Intelligent Tracking Prevention. Advertisers are upset about it, claiming it’s “bad for the ad-supported online content and services consumers love.” Apple is undeterred by the rhetoric. But what does the feature actually do?

The Cheapest Ways to Stream NBA Basketball (Without Cable)

I love NBA basketball. Every year, I get really excited around the beginning of September because I know tip-off is approaching. This year, I also had to figure out how I’m going to watch the Bulls (lose almost every game) with a combination of streaming packages. That’s fun. And slightly depressing.

Why Do Some Websites Have Pop-Up Warnings About Cookies?

If you spend any time at all on the web, you’ve probably come across a fairly normal site that seems strangely concerned about cookie education. You’ll see a pop-up that warns you that yes, the site uses cookies…just like almost every other page on the web. If the warning seems redundant and ineffectual, you’re not the only one to think so. But some people think it’s necessary, and those very specific people are in the European Union.