Map Any Key to Any Key on Windows 10, 8, 7, or Vista

If you are tired of the way certain keys on your system work, such as the Caps Lock key, you can re-map them to function as a different key by using a registry hack. But there should be an easier way, right?

This is where SharpKeys comes into the picture: It’s a small utility that will let you easily map one key to another key easily, or even turn the key off, without having to enter the registry at all.¬†For instance, I used the key mapping to just turn off my Caps Lock key, since I never use it.

Note that we’ve tested this in Windows 10, Windows 8, Windows 7, and Vista, and it works fine in all of them in our testing.

This is especially useful if you’re running Windows on your Mac via BootCamp and the Opt / Cmd keys don’t translate correctly to the Windows and Alt keys.

image

You can click the Add button to bring up the Add New Key Mapping dialog, where you can either select the keys to map from the lists, or just click the Type Key button and press the key manually (which I find much more intuitive)

image

Once you are done, click the Write to Registry button and you’ll be told to log off or reboot for the changes to take effect.

image

If you want all the technical details on how the registry keys work, you can read about how to map keys using registry hacks.

Download SharpKeys from Codeplex

Lowell Heddings, better known online as the How-To Geek, spends all his free time bringing you fresh geekery on a daily basis. You can follow him on if you'd like.

  • Published 01/30/15
More Articles You Might Like

Enter Your Email Here to Get Access for Free:

Go check your email!