Facebook Upgrades Two Factor Authentication: Here’s How to Set It Up

Facebook has had two-factor authentication for a long time, but it used to be called Login Approvals. Now it’s been polished and streamlined and it doesn’t require a phone number. Here’s how to setup 2FA for Facebook using Authy or your favorite authenticator app.

Not sure what Two-Factor authentication is? Basically, whenever you try to login to your account from a new device, Facebook (or whatever site you are trying to log in to) will send you a text message to your phone with a code to enter, making sure that it’s really you. You could also use a special application like Authy or Google Authenticator that has a special code on your phone to enter when logging in. Unfortunately, SMS two-factor isn’t quite as secure as the non-SMS kind—but any two-factor is better than none.

It’s definitely a good idea to setup more security on your Facebook account. If it’s the first time you’ve enabled two-factor, you may as well just do the SMS text message option and use the code. It’s simple and easy. Once you’re a pro at locking everything down, it might be time to look at setting up Authy.

Ready to setup two factor for Facebook? Here’s how to do it:

  1. Go to Settings -> Account Settings
  2. Click on “Security and Login”
  3. Scroll down a little and click on “Use two-factor authentication”
  4. Follow the prompts to either enter a code from a text message or an authentication app.

Once you’re all done enabling two-factor, the next time you login to your Facebook account from a new device, you’re going to be required to enter the code.

And now that your account has two-factor enabled, you will get access to some additional features—for instance, you can use a security key like Yubikey to protect your Facebook account.

On the same page you’ll also find some recovery codes that would be useful if you don’t have access to your phone while you’re traveling. It’s probably a good idea to print them and save them somewhere offline.

Lowell Heddings is the founder and Editor-in-Chief of How-To Geek. He spends all his free time making sure this site can bring you fresh geekery on a daily basis, and has been doing so for over eleven years.