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(Solved) - My hard drive is now a RAW file system and says it needs to be formmated?

(12 posts)
  • Started 7 years ago by ttt777
  • Latest reply from Lighthouse
  • Topic Viewed 12969 times

ttt777
Posts: 0

I have recently discovered that I cannot access my external hard drive. I receive a pop-up window saying: "This drive is not formatted, would you like to format it? Yes/No." I haven't clicked the format button because I need the data on the drive. I'm running Microsoft Windows XP Professional 2002 Service Pack 3, and I have done some reading and believe it's doing this because I didn't safely eject the drive a time I removed it. I have attempted to use TestDisk for Windows, but it isn't displaying the correct amount of memory for the drive, the drive is 1 terabyte but only 100 and something Kilobytes are shown.* Any other ways to fix this?
*(It says not to use it unless the memory matches.)
Any help would be appreciated!

Posted 7 years ago
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raphoenix
Posts: 0

http://blog.atola.com/restorin.....-capacity/

Posted 7 years ago
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Lighthouse
Posts: 0

Try running a Surface Scan with the free version of PW,
http://www.partitionwizard.com.....nager.html

Posted 7 years ago
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ttt777
Posts: 0

@raphoenix: It doesn't show the drive name, it just shows the my internal hard drive, and then 3 other things, it should be one of the slaves though right?:

@Lighthouse: Tried it, doesn't show anything is wrong. However, I noticed the program was showing the correct file system for the drive, just the incorrect data amount, it said like -989438984938% was filled! Could this be a problem with the MBR?

Posted 7 years ago
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whs
Posts: 0

Try the free EaseUS. It is supposed to recover the data - but I have never tried that myself. http://www.ptdd.com/

Posted 7 years ago
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StringJunky
Posts: 0

This one worked for me:

http://download.cnet.com/MiniT.....61431.html

Watch you don't accept to download the toolbar during installation.

Posted 7 years ago
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ttt777
Posts: 0

The capacity restore isn't showing the hard drive at all, and I tried doing fixmbr and fixboot in windows recovery, but the drive didn't even show up. And I just tried the last posts suggestion, it shows the drives true capacity, but apparently there are no partitions on the drive. Should I create a partition? Will creating a partition damage the files on the drive?

Posted 6 years ago
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ttt777
Posts: 0

Ok, I was able to change the file system from RAW to FAT, but it originally was NTFS, so I cannot access any of the files on it. I know they are still there because the HDD size is way below the correct amount of 1TB. I tried converting it to NTFS, but I need 2140 KB of space, and apparently I only have 112 KB.
Is there a way to open up more space? Capacity Restore doesn't detect the drive also.

Posted 6 years ago
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Lighthouse
Posts: 0

See this,
http://technet.microsoft.com/e.....56984.aspx

Posted 6 years ago
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ttt777
Posts: 0

I understand how to convert it, I can't though, the hard drive doesn't have enough space to convert. It says I need 2240KB of space, and it says I only have 112KB. Is it possible to convert from FAT to FAT32? In that article I read that FAT32 is more efficient in using space, so I might have enough to convert it to NTFS.

Posted 6 years ago
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ttt777
Posts: 0

Well, I finally said screw it, I don't need these files that badly, and reformatted the drive. And then I went and recovered all the files on it :D I read up somewhere that formatting doesn't completely remove the data on the drive, so I used a recovery program and retrieved all(Not 100% sure) of the files. I don't know why I didn't do this in the first place.

Posted 6 years ago
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Lighthouse
Posts: 0

Yes, I have done that, recovered upto 95% of a 1TB RAW disk.

Posted 6 years ago
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