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A test

(68 posts)
  • Started 4 years ago by Lighthouse
  • Latest reply from Lighthouse
  • Topic Viewed 2367 times

Lighthouse
Posts: 13598

Something I remember very well from my fire training. (in the UK)

What colours of extinguisher contain different contents.

Posted 4 years ago
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GuiltySpark
Posts: 4024

All of them :)

Posted 4 years ago
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CompWiz
Posts: 864

Aren't they all red?

Posted 4 years ago
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Ted16
Posts: 1952

Nope :) There are types for Electrical fires, Paper fires etc, which use water or foam or powder. We had three different types in our workshop. All different colours. Wont give game away :)

Ted

Posted 4 years ago
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Lighthouse
Posts: 13598

You is all wrong so far.

Posted 4 years ago
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GuiltySpark
Posts: 4024

Green and Black.

Posted 4 years ago
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Lighthouse
Posts: 13598

no

Posted 4 years ago
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GuiltySpark
Posts: 4024

A real one and a Joke one.

Posted 4 years ago
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Ted16
Posts: 1952

Red had water,, Green had foam, and Blue I think and Black was Carbon Dioxide As far as I remember. Never had to use one in all my working life but they had to be serviced every year and documented.

Ted

Posted 4 years ago
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Lighthouse
Posts: 13598

wrong again

Posted 4 years ago
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Ted16
Posts: 1952

Can we distinguisher what you are asking then LOL

Posted 4 years ago
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Lighthouse
Posts: 13598

Exactly what I posted. I will tell you, that every member of the class (all well trained in fire fighting) got it wrong. And we had to retrain every 3 years, but this one threw a wobbly at us.

Posted 4 years ago
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Xhi
Posts: 6298

Class A Extinguishers
Fire extinguishers in the Class A category have a green symbol on the front of the canister with a picture of a burning garbage can. These extinguishers are used on ordinary combustibles, such as wood or paper, and typically contain plain water.

Class B Extinguishers
Class B fire extinguishers have a red square as their symbol containing a picture of a gasoline can with a burning puddle inside. These are used for flammable liquids such as gasoline or oil. They typically have carbon dioxide or foam inside.

Class C Extinguishers
Class C is used for energized electrical equipment that has caught fire, such as a fuse box or an outlet. These have a blue circle with a picture of an electric plug and a burning outlet as their symbol. They typically contain a dry chemical to put out these fires.

Class D Extinguishers
Class D extinguishers are usually only found in laboratories. They are for use on chemicals that have caught fire, such as magnesium or titanium. The symbol for this class is a yellow star that contains no added picture.

Read more: Why Are the Fire Extinguishers Different Colors? | eHow.com
http://www.ehow.com/facts_7843.....z27VkAC0TJ

Posted 4 years ago
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Lighthouse
Posts: 13598

wrong

Posted 4 years ago
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warlock
Posts: 4100

Colour Coding

Prior to 1st Jan 1997, the code of practice for fire extinguishers in the UK was BS 5423, which advised the colour coding of fire extinguishers as follows:

Water - Red

Foam - Cream

Dry Powder - Blue

Carbon Dioxide (CO2) - Black

Halon - Green (now 'illegal' except for a few exceptions such as the Police, Armed Services and Aircraft).

New extinguishers should conform to BS EN 3, which requires that the entire body of the extinguisher be coloured red. A zone of colour of up to 5% of the external area can be used to identify the contents using the old colour coding shown above.

Posted 4 years ago
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Lighthouse
Posts: 13598

wrong
It is so obscure you would not believe.

Posted 4 years ago
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warlock
Posts: 4100

solid colors?

Posted 4 years ago
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Lighthouse
Posts: 13598

Yes.

Posted 4 years ago
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GuiltySpark
Posts: 4024

Green and Red = Full and Empty.

Posted 4 years ago
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Lighthouse
Posts: 13598

Nope.

Posted 4 years ago
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GuiltySpark
Posts: 4024

I got no idea.

Posted 4 years ago
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warlock
Posts: 4100

Any new extinguishers will be red and it is the coloured label which shows the
contents and the type of fire on which it should be used.

Posted 4 years ago
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CompWiz
Posts: 864

Posted 4 years ago
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Lighthouse
Posts: 13598

Again, not so.

Posted 4 years ago
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CompWiz
Posts: 864

so..?

Posted 4 years ago
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Ted16
Posts: 1952

Is it the coloured dots that change colour when the unit has passed it's OK to use day ?

Nah I didn't think so :) anyway if it's so obscure and we wont believe it are we bovered :)

Ted :)

Posted 4 years ago
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vistamike
Posts: 10945

I just can't be bothered either!

Unless you work with this, which I have set up through a BMS

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Inergen

Posted 4 years ago
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Drizzle
Posts: 2045

FIRE BLANKET.. or..

Prior to 1st Jan 1997, the code of practice for fire extinguishers in the UK was BS 5423, which advised the colour coding of fire extinguishers as follows:

Water - Red

Foam - Cream

Dry Powder - Blue

Carbon Dioxide (CO2) - Black

Halon - Green (now 'illegal' except for a few exceptions such as the Police, Armed Services and Aircraft).

New extinguishers should conform to BS EN 3, which requires that the entire body of the extinguisher be coloured red. A zone of colour of up to 5% of the external area can be used to identify the contents using the old colour coding shown above.
http://www.mfs-fire-extinguishers.co.uk/types.htm

Posted 4 years ago
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Lighthouse
Posts: 13598

Even transporting Halon was banned in rotary winged aircraft many, many, years ago.

Posted 4 years ago
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warlock
Posts: 4100

Well LH, since all well trained firefighters got it wrong and I have no firefighting training, I give up.

Posted 4 years ago
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CompWiz
Posts: 864

Stop, drop, and roll !!

Posted 4 years ago
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Drizzle
Posts: 2045

Awh!!!!Quit

Posted 4 years ago
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GuiltySpark
Posts: 4024

So what's the answer ?

Posted 4 years ago
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ProstheticHead
Posts: 3281

Red ones.

Posted 4 years ago
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warlock
Posts: 4100

The wrong colours.

Posted 4 years ago
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Lighthouse
Posts: 13598

Will tell you at some point :)

Posted 4 years ago
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warlock
Posts: 4100

Probably have to make it a sticky :)

Posted 4 years ago
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hatryst
Posts: 3482

Something to do with the colours, i bet.

Posted 4 years ago
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Lighthouse
Posts: 13598

Yep. I already said that.

Posted 4 years ago
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warlock
Posts: 4100

bump

Posted 4 years ago
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ProstheticHead
Posts: 3281

Not one for keeping people in suspenders..

Posted 4 years ago
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warlock
Posts: 4100

Just thought I'd try.

Posted 4 years ago
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Lighthouse
Posts: 13598

Oops, guess I'd better answer then.
Any colour you like, even corporate. But the first one I learned about was Harrods. All their extinguishers were chrome plated.
The only indication of what they contained, was on a small label at the back, which had contents, manufacturer, and 10 or so lines where you have to write in the date, and sign, for the annual inspection. Thus it meant taking off the wall to see what it was.
Dry powder ones need monthly attention.
Water and foam ones need emptying out yearly, new water, and cartridges put in.
Pre pressure ones, just keep a regular eye on the gauge.

Posted 4 years ago
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warlock
Posts: 4100


Thanks LH.

Posted 4 years ago
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Lighthouse
Posts: 13598

That 1st solution was dead on.

Posted 4 years ago
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warlock
Posts: 4100

Sorry, I didn't know an edit would screw the download up.

Posted 4 years ago
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Lighthouse
Posts: 13598

Set it again for you :)

Posted 4 years ago
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warlock
Posts: 4100

Thanks, mate.

Posted 4 years ago
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Lighthouse
Posts: 13598

So who has big dry powder extincters in their house or workshop ?

Posted 4 years ago
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warlock
Posts: 4100

I have the ABC, dry chemical type. http://www.grainger.com/Graing.....sher-2LBP1

Posted 4 years ago
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Lighthouse
Posts: 13598

They came about after I left the service. As they are dry pre pressured, I would ask at your local fire station, whether it needs to to be upturned and shaken once a month. Ask and see what they say. It has to do with the compression of the powder inside.

Posted 4 years ago
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warlock
Posts: 4100

Could be, just bought about it about a week ago had the one I replaced it with for at least 25 years. My Bad, for sure. Trick or treat night here because of the storms. Changed from Oct. 31st. till tonight. Very busy with the little gremlins.

Posted 4 years ago
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Lighthouse
Posts: 13598

btw, the ones you have in your cars, change once a year.

Posted 4 years ago
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warlock
Posts: 4100

Another my bad. Have none in my car.

Posted 4 years ago
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Lighthouse
Posts: 13598

Rule of thumb. Only use yours to stop other drivers car fires.They are a pain to to clean up after. (get some illegal halon for yourself)

Posted 4 years ago
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warlock
Posts: 4100

http://www.reliablefire.com/po.....211_i.html I don't have one but, stil looks legal here in the USA. Thanks for the tip.

Posted 4 years ago
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Lighthouse
Posts: 13598

Weird thing was that when they where made illegal in the UK, and could not be flown off charged in the helicopters, they were emptied out prior to. Rather defeats the purpose of the exercise.

Posted 4 years ago
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warlock
Posts: 4100

Just into the atmosphere?

Posted 4 years ago
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Lighthouse
Posts: 13598

Yep. Which was the regs said was not to happen.

Posted 4 years ago
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warlock
Posts: 4100

4How Damaging Is Halon to the Ozone Layer?

A compound's ability to destroy ozone depends on many factors, including the amount of chlorine and/or bromine that it contains. To aid in comparing compounds, scientists have developed a relative scale called the ozone depletion potential (ODP). Common refrigerants, like those found in refrigerators and in automobile air conditioners, have been assigned the value 1 as a reference. Halon 1301 has the value between 10 and 16, meaning it has 10-16 times the more potential for destroying the ozone layer.

Halon use worldwide is significantly less than that of CFCs, so even though it is more damaging to the ozone layer, there is not as much of it released into the atmosphere. In fact, it is estimated that overall Halon accounts for less than 20% of ozone depletion.

Oh well.

Posted 4 years ago
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Lighthouse
Posts: 13598

Yep. I know, and you know. The European parliament didn't. With all the money they poured into it.
We should have a few in every house.

Posted 4 years ago
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warlock
Posts: 4100

I will get one now. Thanks to you. Still okay here from what Iv'e read.

Posted 4 years ago
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Lighthouse
Posts: 13598

Well I do know my stuff.

Posted 4 years ago
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warlock
Posts: 4100

I know, we don't try to steer anyone wrong here. If it happens it happens. But, known you now for two years on the forum. Appreciate your import.

Posted 4 years ago
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Lighthouse
Posts: 13598

Or even input :)

Posted 4 years ago
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warlock
Posts: 4100

Vowel problem again. Thanks Master. LH.

Posted 4 years ago
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warlock
Posts: 4100

So who has big dry powder extincters in their house or workshop ?
while we are at it check the spelling from the cut and paste from your post. Above.

Posted 4 years ago
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Lighthouse
Posts: 13598

They may have a small one (and a fire blanket) in the kitchen.
Cut and paste ? Don't recall doing any of them.

Posted 4 years ago
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