Walter Glenn

Walter Glenn is a long time computer geek and tech writer. Though he's mostly a Windows and gadget guy, he has a fondness for anything tech. You can follow him on Facebook and Twitter.

The icons for your files and programs are stored in a cache, so that Windows can display them quickly instead of having to load them from source files every time. If you’ve ever noticed that Windows Explorer loads icons slowly, especially when you first start your computer or open a folder with lots of files, increasing the size of the icon cache might help. Here’s how to do it with a simple Registry hack.

about 1 year ago - by  |  8 Replies

Siri makes for a handy assistant, capable of all sorts of useful things. But if you’ve ever been in a meeting or theater and had Siri get triggered by accident, you know she can also be a bit of a nuisance. By default, Siri speaks aloud even when you have your phone muted. Here’s how to change that.

about 1 year ago - by  |  1 Reply

Even in these times of fast internet connections, huge hard drives, and loads of free cloud storage, file size sometimes matters. You might have a limit to the size of files you can send or receive via email, or you might be running low on thumb drive space. Whatever the reason, if you have Office documents that include images, you might be able to significantly reduce the size of those files.

about 1 year ago - by  |  3 Replies

Perhaps you have drafts of old messages you didn’t have time to finish, or maybe you use draft messages as templates so you don’t have to type things over and over again. However you use drafts, here’s a quicker way to access them in the iOS Mail app instead of browsing around for your Drafts folder.

about 1 year ago - by  |  1 Reply

Even if you use the Windows Command Prompt a lot, you might be surprised at the number of useful keyboard shortcuts it supports. You can use them to streamline everything from selecting and manipulating text to repeating commands you’ve already typed. And we’ve got the full list for you.

about 1 year ago - by  |  5 Replies

There are all kinds of apps out there touting the ability to help people suffering from anxiety, depression, and any number of other disorders. Some are free, some are not. Some offer a total self-help approach, while others are geared more as an adjunct to traditional therapy. Join us as we take a look at whether these apps can really be of any help and how to weed out the many choices.

about 1 year ago - by  |  1 Reply

In audio/video parlance, “scrubbing” is the act of fast-forwarding or reversing through the audio track or video to a particular location.  Most of the time, the default speed is fine, but if you’re looking for a particular location (especially in a long video), it helps to slow down the scrubbing speed. You can do that easily in Apple apps like Safari and Music, and also in some third-party apps. Here’s how.

about 1 year ago - by  |  1 Reply

Calling people with Siri is a great little shortcut, but it isn’t always natural to say “Call Jane Smith” instead of “Call Mom”. Luckily, you can teach Siri who people are–your parents, your doctor, or anyone else–for even more convenient voice calling.

about 1 year ago - by  |  2 Replies

Emoji are fun to use, but if you’re like most people, you tend to use a few of them a lot more often than others. Instead of switching to the Emoji keyboard every time, why not set up a text replacement shortcut so that you can just type the Emoji you want to use?

about 1 year ago - by  |  2 Replies

If you’ve been using Windows for very long at all, you’ve probably heard of Microsoft’s .NET, probably because an application asked you to install it, or you noticed it in your list of installed programs. Unless you’re a developer, you don’t need a lot of knowledge to make use of it. You just need it to work. But, since we geeks like knowing things, join us as we explore just what .NET is and why so many applications need it.

about 1 year ago - by  |  11 Replies

By default, iOS shows notifications in the order you received them. That can be handy, of course, but if you get a lot of notifications, you may find it easier to group notifications by the app they come from. You can also sort notifications manually so that the apps you care about always show their notifications first on your list. Here’s how to do that in iOS.

about 1 year ago - by  |  1 Reply

By default, iOS devices remember the Wi-Fi networks that you’ve joined in the past, and will attempt to automatically reconnect in the future. This feature is pretty handy most of the time, but on occasion can be a nuisance. Fortunately, it’s easy to have iOS forget specific Wi-Fi networks.

about 1 year ago - by  |  1 Reply

By default, only users with administrator rights in Windows 10 can change time and date settings. If you’re using Windows 10 Professional or Enterprise edition, however, you can use Group Policy to allow standard users to change the time and date. Here’s how to do it.

about 1 year ago - by  |  4 Replies

If you’re like most Windows users, you have lots of great little utilities that run when you start Windows. While this works great for most apps, there are some that would be nice to start even before a user logs in to the PC. To do this, you’ll need to run the app as a Windows service.

about 1 year ago - by  |  9 Replies

Windows Homegroup is great for sharing documents, pictures, and printers between computers on your home network. If you’ve had it set up for a while, you may have noticed that the ghosts of old computer hang around in your Homegroup list. Here’s how to banish them.

about 1 year ago - by  |  1 Reply

You found somebody’s lost iPhone. They were cautious enough to enable a passcode, so you can’t root around in their contacts looking for the owner. If Siri is enabled, though, she can help you get the iPhone back to the right person.

about 1 year ago - by  |  1 Reply

The iPhone has a hidden “field test” mode that shows all kinds of technical details about signal strength, cell towers, and more. Most of it is not very useful to the average person, but you can make it show you your phone’s actual signal strength instead of just how many bars you’re getting. And that can be useful.

about 1 year ago - by  |  16 Replies

OneDrive may primarily be a cloud syncing service, but even if you don’t use OneDrive as your primary cloud storage, it has one killer feature: with it, you can remotely access any file on your PC, even if that file is not in your OneDrive folders.

about 1 year ago - by  |  11 Replies

The Windows Registry offers a treasure trove of possible tweaks for your PC, but it’s a complicated structure to work in. You can make things a little easier by bookmarking your favorite locations.

about 1 year ago - by  |  1 Reply

Earlier this month, Google added a Goals feature to the Google Calendar apps for iOS and Android. Goals automatically finds free time in your calendar and schedules recurring events to help you achieve your goals. Here’s how to get it all set up.

about 1 year ago - by  |  1 Reply

Starting with iOS 7, Apple introduced a feature named Activation Lock for iOS devices. When you sign in with an iCloud account and enable the “Find My” feature, the phone becomes tied to your iCloud account. If you’re buying or selling a device, you’ll want to ensure that the Activation Lock is disabled so that it can then be activated by the new user.

about 1 year ago - by  |  Comments (0)

Your iOS device has several numerical identifiers associated with it. Two of the most important are the device’s serial number and International Mobile Station Equipment Identity (IMEI) number. You can use both to identify your phone when you’re scheduling repairs, activating or deactivating devices, or even reporting a device lost or stolen.

about 1 year ago - by  |  1 Reply

When Apple first debuted the iPhone 6 and 6 Plus with their larger screens, they also introduced a feature named Reachability that makes it easier to reach the top of the screen when you’re using the device with one hand. It’s surprising, though, how many people don’t know the feature exists, or think it’s some kind of bug when they encounter it. Here’s how to use it and how to turn it off if you don’t like it.

about 1 year ago - by  |  3 Replies

If you use the Windows Registry Editor with any regularity, you’ve probably found more than once that you’ve drilled down to a key in the wrong hive. Maybe you drilled down to a key in HKEY_CURRENT_USER when you really meant HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE . Instead of backing all the way out and clicking your way down to the right hive, we’ve got an easier way.

about 1 year ago - by  |  6 Replies

That feeling you get when you close the wrong browser tab by accident is no fun. Fortunately, Safari for iOS, like most modern browsers, provides a way to recover from your little mishap. You just have to know where to look.

about 1 year ago - by  |  1 Reply