Garmin Dash Cam Live on a pink background
Garmin

Dash cams are an excellent way to keep yourself protected from car accidents… assuming you are not the cause. Garmin already sells a lot of dash cams, but now the company has revealed one that is always connected with LTE.

🎉 The Garmin Dash Cam Live is a How-To Geek Best of CES 2023 award winner! Make sure to check out our full list of winners to learn more about exciting products coming in 2023.

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Dash cams with dedicated cellular connections are nothing new — there’s the CM1000 LTE module for some BlackView dash cams, Raven Connected Car, and others to name a few — but this is Garmin’s first attempt. The Garmin Dash Cam Live has all the usual dash cam features, like a 1440p resolution, a 140-degree FOV, a microSD card slot for saving recordings, GPS for saving location data, and some software tweaks to enhance night recordings. There are also voice commands to start/stop recording, take a photo, or mark the current recording as a video for later.

The main selling point here is the LTE support, so the camera can be accessed from anywhere at any time — more like a smart home security camera than a typical dash cam. You can retrieve recordings from the camera without taking out the SD card or connecting to a Wi-Fi hotspot. Videos saved manually (e.g. with a voice command) and detected incidents are automatically uploaded to cloud storage for at least 24 hours.

Garmin’s new camera is impressive, but it will cost you. It’s available now for $399.99, well above most non-LTE dash cams — Garmin’s own 1080p Dash Cam Mini 2 is $130. That always-on LTE connection isn’t free, so there’s also a subscription that enables live view, location tracking, theft alerts, parking guard notifications, and extending the cloud storage for clips up to 30 days. The plans start at $4.99 per month.

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Corbin Davenport is the News Editor at How-To Geek, an independent software developer, and a podcaster. He previously worked at Android Police, PC Gamer, and XDA Developers.
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