Rating: 7/10 ?
  • 1 - Does not work
  • 2 - Barely functional
  • 3 - Severely lacking in most areas
  • 4 - Functions, but has numerous issues
  • 5 - Fine yet leaves a lot to be desired
  • 6 - Good enough to buy on sale
  • 7 - Great and worth purchasing
  • 8 - Fantastic, approaching best-in-class
  • 9 - Best-in-class
  • 10 - Borderline perfection
Price: $40
Microsoft Sculpt Comfort Mouse
Hannah Stryker / How-To Geek
The Sculpt Comfort mouse offers great performance on various surfaces, and its customization options can be a significant value-add for those who need quick access to specific functions.

While it has been around for many years now, the Microsoft Sculpt Comfort mouse still offers it all: a truly wireless experience, a four-way scroll wheel, and a unique Touch-tab with customizable shortcuts. But its age might finally be catching up to it.

The Sculpt Comfort doesn’t offer ambidextrous variants or hand-friendly ergonomics as many modern mice do, but it still gets the basics right and then some. It’s generally on sale for under $30 and can be an excellent option for folks who want a versatile mouse that can be used on the go.

Here's What We Like

  • No transceiver wireless design
  • Works well with Android phones
  • Precise cursor control on various surfaces
  • Four-way scroll wheel allows for easy navigation
  • Customizable shortcuts for frequently used functions

And What We Don't

  • Might not feel ergonomic for large palms
  • Right-handed design only
  • Glossy black design gets smudged

How-To Geek's expert reviewers go hands-on with each product we review. We put every piece of hardware through hours of testing in the real world and run them through benchmarks in our lab. We never accept payment to endorse or review a product and never aggregate other people’s reviews. Read more >>

Build and Design: Good, but Only Subjectively So

Close up of Microsoft logo on Microsoft Sculpt Comfort Mouse
Hannah Stryker / How-To Geek

  • Dimensions: 4.37 x 2.69 x 1.44in (11.1 x 6.83 x 3.66cm)
  • Weight: 136.1g (4.8oz)
  • Form: Right-Handed
  • In the Box: Mouse, 2 AA batteries

In terms of build quality, the Microsoft Sculpt Comfort Mouse is well-constructed and feels sturdy in hand. It has a solid, premium feel, and the buttons are responsive and have a satisfying click. There’s not much going on aesthetically except the blue Windows button on the side and a Microsoft logo at the top. The glossy black top plate is prone to smudges, and an all-around matte finish would have been welcome.

As the name suggests, this mouse is “sculpted” for comfort, with a contoured left edge that lets your thumb rests naturally along it. Although the right edge features no such curves, making it a mouse strictly designed for right-handers. The mouse has a sloping shape that follows a palm’s natural curvature and a raised back that supports it comfortably. Its compact design might feel ergonomically perfect for small to medium-sized palms, but for larger hands sizes like mine, its super-low profile and lack of space to rest your fingers on might end up feeling uncomfortable instead.

At the bottom, you get the on/off switch and a Bluetooth pairing button. The mouse runs on two AA batteries that come in the box and offers a relatively long battery life, lasting up to six months on a single set. Microsoft claims that turning the mouse off between uses can extend this up to 10 months. Even with turning it on and off frequently, I encountered no problems with the mouse reconnecting to my PC every time. It’s worth noting that this mouse doesn’t support multi-device connectivity and can only be paired to one device at a time.

Functions and Usage: Still Going Strong

Person Using Microsoft Sculpt Comfort Mouse
Hannah Stryker / How-To Geek

  • Connectivity: Bluetooth
  • USB Transceiver: NA
  • Compatibility: Windows 7 and above, Android 5.0 and above

This is one of the few truly wireless mice out there, using a Bluetooth connection without needing a USB transceiver, thus saving you the hassles of a perpetually clogged USB port. Though this means your machine needs to have built-in Bluetooth, which isn’t a problem with most modern laptops; however, some older desktop PCs might need a USB Bluetooth adaptor.

While it’s primarily meant to be used with Windows machines, this mouse can also work with MacBooks and devices running Google’s Android or chromeOS. I tried using it with my Samsung Galaxy Z Fold 4, and it worked like a charm, though there’s no way to customize or remap the mouse buttons on non-Windows devices.

One of the standout features of the Sculpt Comfort Mouse is its BlueTrack technology, which allows it to work on a wide range of surfaces, including glass and wood. This makes it a versatile option for users who may not always have a mouse pad available or for those who need to use their mouse on the go. My usage wasn’t as extreme; The mouse worked perfectly fine on wooden tables, paper, printed mousepads, and metallic laptop lids.

The unique selling point of this mouse is the “Touch tab,” a small touch-sensitive area located on the side of the mouse that can be configured to perform various functions. Some of the things you can do with the Touch tab include scrolling or navigating through pages using swipes, launching specific apps or programs when tapped, and even performing custom actions such as opening a particular file or folder. Pro users will appreciate the advanced options to have the same gestures perform different functions inside different apps.

During my time with the mouse, I set an upward thumb swipe to snap the active window to the left edge of the screen while a tap was set to launch the Start menu. The mouse also allows turning on vibration feedback for swipe gestures on the Touch tab. Once you get used to them, these Touch Tab shortcuts can truly boost productivity and add efficiency to your workflow.

In terms of performance, the Sculpt Comfort Mouse has a responsive cursor and smooth, precise tracking, making it a good choice for casual use like photo editing and web browsing tasks. The notched scroll wheel offers horizontal scrolling, a godsend for video editing and other timeline-based apps. All of the buttons and scroll wheel actions are remappable using the Microsoft Mouse and Keyboard Center software.

The Best Mice of 2023

Best Mouse Overall
Razer Pro Click Humanscale Wireless Mouse
Logitech G203 Wired Lightsync Mouse
Best Budget Mouse
Logitech G203 Wired Lightsync Mouse
Logitech G502 X plus Lightspeed
Best Gaming Mouse
Logitech G502 X plus Lightspeed
Logitech MX Master 3S
Best Wireless Mouse
Logitech MX Master 3S
Razer Basilisk V3
Best Wired Mouse
Razer Basilisk V3
Logitech MX Vertical
Best Ergonomic Mouse
Logitech MX Vertical
Apple Magic Mouse 2
Best Mouse for Mac
Apple Magic Mouse 2

Should You Buy the Microsoft Sculpt Comfort Mouse?

Microsoft Sculpt Comfort Mouse in hand
Hannah Stryker / How-To Geek

The Microsoft Sculpt Comfort mouse offers great performance on a variety of surfaces, and its customization options can be a significant value-add for those who need quick access to specific functions. The fact that it doesn’t eat up a USB port is a bonus. Its compatibility with non-Windows computers and Android phones makes it a versatile accessory, though we would have loved the option for multi-device connectivity.

However, the lack of a left-handed version will be a deal-breaker for some, and the mouse misses out on the newer ergonomic trends like those found in the Logitech MX Master 3S. It doesn’t offer any dedicated gaming features or multiple DPI options found in the best high-end gaming mice, but for $40 (or less when it’s on sale), the Sculpt Comfort provides a reliable experience with solid battery life.

If all you’re looking for is a plain jane mouse for casual use, plenty of mice on the market offer similar performance at even lower prices.  All said and done, it’s still a good buy, especially at its discounted price on Amazon. If you’re looking for a mouse that can do a bit more for your specific use case, here are some of the best Bluetooth mice you should consider.

Rating: 7/10
Price: $40

Here’s What We Like

  • No transceiver wireless design
  • Works well with Android phones
  • Precise cursor control on various surfaces
  • Four-way scroll wheel allows for easy navigation
  • Customizable shortcuts for frequently used functions

And What We Don't

  • Might not feel ergonomic for large palms
  • Right-handed design only
  • Glossy black design gets smudged
Profile Photo for Rushil Agrawal Rushil Agrawal
Rushil Agrawal is a freelance gadget reviewer and a full-time nerd. He started his tech journalism career with MySmartPrice, India's leading tech publication. Running their YouTube channel for 3+ years, garnering over 800K subscribers in the process, he still considers himself lucky to have used over 200 smartphones, along with an equally impressive assortment of smart TVs, TWS earbuds, wearables, and more.
Read Full Bio »