The Windows 11 logo and desktop background on a PC laptop.
diy13/Shutterstock.com

Microsoft is gradually offering Windows 11 to more Windows 10 PCs over time. You can skip this slow, careful rollout process and get Windows 11 immediately—even if Windows Update isn’t offering it on your PC yet.

How to Force the Windows 11 Upgrade Right Now

If you want Windows 11 right now, the fastest way to get it is with Microsoft’s Windows 11 Installation Assistant.

To start installing Windows 11, visit Microsoft’s Download Windows 11 website. Click the “Download Now” button under the Windows 11 Installation Assistant heading.

Run the downloaded “Windows11InstallationAssistant.exe” file. It will check to see if your computer is compatible with Windows 11 in its current state. If your computer meets the requirements, it will offer to install Windows 11. Accept the license agreement and, after a more few clicks, the tool will begin installing Windows 11 on your PC.

Warning: By upgrading to Windows 11 in this way, you’re skipping Microsoft’s slow and careful rollout. You are at increased risk of encountering a problem with Windows 11 and your hardware or software configuration. For the safest possible upgrade process, wait until Windows Update offers you Windows 11. However, Windows 11 is stable, so it will probably work well on your hardware. If you do encounter a problem, you can choose to downgrade to Windows 10 within the first 10 days after upgrading.
Tip: Be sure you have current backups of any important files before you upgrade to Windows 11 or any other new operating system.

RELATED: How to Upgrade Your PC to Windows 11

How to Upgrade If Your PC Isn’t Supported

If your PC doesn’t meet Windows 11’s requirements, the Installation Assistant will say you’re using an unsupported PC. However, there are still ways to install Windows 11 on many unsupported PCs.

First, it’s helpful to know why exactly Windows 11 doesn’t support your PC. Download Microsoft’s PC Health Check app. It will check if your PC is supported and, if your PC isn’t supported, it will tell you what the problem is.

Once you have more information, follow our guide to installing Windows 11 on an unsupported PC for concrete steps you can take to resolve your issues. For example, on some PCs, you may simply need to enable TPM 2.0 or Secure Boot in the UEFI firmware (also known as the BIOS). If the problem is that your PC has an older CPU or it only has TPM 1.2, there’s a registry hack that will let you bypass the hardware requirements and install Windows 11 anyway.

Many PCs will be able to upgrade to Windows 11 after some tweaking, even if Microsoft’s Installation Assistant say they aren’t supported. However, quite a few PCs won’t be able to install Windows 11. If your PC is too old and has a problem that can’t by bypassed, be aware that Microsoft will continue supporting Windows 10 with security updates until October 2025.

If you need Windows 11 sooner, consider buying a new computer. Most computer made in the last few years will run Windows 11. Even if they come with Windows 10, it’ll be quick and easy to upgrade.

RELATED: The Best Laptops of 2021 for Work, Play, and Everything In Between

Profile Photo for Chris Hoffman Chris Hoffman
Chris Hoffman is Editor-in-Chief of How-To Geek. He's written about technology for over a decade and was a PCWorld columnist for two years. Chris has written for The New York Times, been interviewed as a technology expert on TV stations like Miami's NBC 6, and had his work covered by news outlets like the BBC. Since 2011, Chris has written over 2,000 articles that have been read nearly one billion times---and that's just here at How-To Geek.
Read Full Bio »

The above article may contain affiliate links, which help support How-To Geek.