Need to move some data around? When you have a spreadsheet that you want to move to a different workbook or copy to a new one, Google Sheets has you covered. Here’s how to do it.

If you’ve moved or copied sheets in Microsoft Excel, then you’ll be glad to know you use the same types of actions in Google Sheets. However, Google Sheets is a bit more limited when it comes to the options.

Copy a Spreadsheet in Google Sheets

To copy a sheet in Google Sheets, you can either copy it to a new or existing spreadsheet. If you want to copy the sheet within your current spreadsheet, you’ll use the Duplicate action. We’ll take a look at each of these actions.

Copy to a New Spreadsheet

Click the arrow in the tab for the sheet you want to copy. Move your cursor to Copy and click “New Spreadsheet” in the pop-out menu.

Click the arrow and pick Copy To New Spreadsheet

After a moment, you’ll see a message that your sheet copied successfully. You can click “Open Spreadsheet” to head directly to it or “OK” to open it later.

Sheet copied confirmation

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The new spreadsheet will have the default Untitled Spreadsheet name.

Copy to an Existing Spreadsheet

Click the arrow in the tab for the sheet. Move your cursor to Copy and click “Existing Spreadsheet” in the pop-out menu.

Click the arrow and pick Copy To Existing Spreadsheet

When the window appears, locate and select the spreadsheet in Google Drive.

RELATED: How to Organize Your Google Drive

Use the tabs at the top for My Drive, Shared With Me, or Recent to navigate to the sheet. You can also use the Search box to find it or paste the URL at the bottom. Hit “Select” and a copy of the sheet will pop into that existing workbook.

Locate and select the existing spreadsheet

You’ll see the same message as above that your sheet copied successfully with an option to open it immediately.

Sheet copied confirmation

Also, when you copy to an existing spreadsheet, the name of that sheet will have “Copy of” in front of the original sheet name.

Copy to the Current Spreadsheet

If you want to copy a sheet and keep it within the same workbook, you can do this with a couple of clicks as well.

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Click the arrow in the tab for the sheet and click “Duplicate.”

Click the arrow and pick Duplicate

This places a copy of the sheet on the right with “Copy of” in front of the original sheet name.

Sheet named Copy Of

Move a Spreadsheet in Google Sheets

Your options for moving a spreadsheet in Google Sheets are simply moving it right or left within the tab row.

To move a sheet, click the arrow in the tab for the sheet and choose “Move Right” or “Move Left.”

Click the arrow and pick Move Right or Move Left

If the sheet is the first one on the left or last one on the right, you’ll only see options for the move available.

Click the arrow and pick Move Left

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You can also move a sheet by clicking and holding the tab, dragging it to its new spot, and releasing it.

Click and drag a sheet to move it

Copy Versus Move in Google Sheets

While Excel lets you “move” a sheet to a different workbook, Google Sheets only gives you the option to “copy” one to another workbook as described above. This obviously retains the original sheet and moves only a copy.

So if your intent is to completely remove a sheet from a workbook and move it to a different one, you can use one of the copy actions above and then delete the sheet from the current workbook.

To delete a sheet in Google Sheets, click the arrow in the tab for the sheet and choose “Delete.”

Click the arrow and pick Delete

Then, confirm by clicking “OK.”

Confirm the deletion by clicking OK

If you’re still new to Google Sheets and would welcome additional tips, take a look at our beginner’s guide to Google Sheets.

Sandy Writtenhouse Sandy Writtenhouse
With her B.S. in Information Technology, Sandy worked for many years in the IT industry as a Project Manager, Department Manager, and PMO Lead. She learned how technology can enrich both professional and personal lives by using the right tools. And, she has shared those suggestions and how-tos on many websites over time. With thousands of articles under her belt, Sandy strives to help others use technology to their advantage.
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