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Have you ever received an event invitation that you wanted to attend but had a conflict at that time? If you’re an Outlook user, you can propose a new time for that meeting, appointment, or conference call.

Strangely enough, the feature to propose a new time for an event isn’t available in all versions of Microsoft Outlook. As of this writing in July 2021, you’ll need to use the Outlook desktop application on Windows or Mac.

RELATED: How to Propose a New Time for a Google Calendar Event

How to Propose a New Time in Outlook on Windows

You can propose a new time in Outlook from the email invitation or the event in the calendar.

In the email, click “Propose New Time.” Then select “Tentative and Propose New Time” or “Decline and Propose New Time.”

Click Propose New Time in the Outlook email

To do it in the calendar, select the event and click “Propose New Time.” Then pick “Tentative and Propose New Time” or “Decline and Propose New Time.”

Click Propose New Time in the Outlook calendar

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Whether from your inbox or calendar, you’ll then choose the new time and click “Propose Time” to send the request to the organizer.

Select a time and click Propose Time

How to Propose a New Time in Outlook on Mac

Whether you’re using the updated Outlook on your Mac or the original version of the app, you can propose a new time from the email or the event in the calendar.

Propose a New Time in the New Outlook

You can propose a new time from the email invitation you receive in either your inbox or the email itself.

In your inbox, click “RSVP,” click the Propose New Time (clock face) button, and choose Tentative or Decline to go along with the proposed time. Note that you won’t see this option if you’re using the Compact view for your inbox.

Click RSVP, Propose New Time

In the email, click “Propose New Time” and pick Tentative or Decline to accompany the proposed time.

Click Propose New Time in the Outlook email

In the calendar, select the event and click “RSVP.” Click the Propose New Time button and choose Tentative or Decline and Propose New Time.

Click Propose New Time in the Outlook calendar

Propose a New Time in the Original Outlook

In the email, click “Propose New Time” and pick Tentative or Decline to accompany the proposed time.

Click Propose New Time in the Outlook email

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In the calendar, click the “Propose New Time” button and choose Tentative or Decline and Propose New Time.

Click Propose New Time in the Outlook calendar

In either of the above Outlook versions on Mac and regardless of where you hit the Propose New Time button, you’ll then select the time you want to propose to the organizer and click “Propose New Time” to send it on its way.

Select a time and click Propose New Time

What Happens Next?

After you use the Outlook feature to propose a new time, the event organizer will receive an email. They can then accept your proposal and update the event with the new time or decline it and keep the event time as is.

It’s up to the organizer, if they accept your proposal, to then send an updated request to the attendees.

Why Is “Propose a New Time” Missing?

If you believe you should see the option to propose a new time in the email or event in Outlook, but don’t, there are a couple of reasons this could be.

  • You cannot currently propose a new time for recurring events.
  • The organizer disabled the option for attendees to propose a new time.

To increase your productivity with Mac, read our guide to scheduling in Outlook 365.

RELATED: How to Use the Calendar and Event Scheduling in Outlook 365 for Mac

Sandy Writtenhouse Sandy Writtenhouse
With her B.S. in Information Technology, Sandy worked for many years in the IT industry as a Project Manager, Department Manager, and PMO Lead. She learned how technology can enrich both professional and personal lives by using the right tools. And, she has shared those suggestions and how-tos on many websites over time. With thousands of articles under her belt, Sandy strives to help others use technology to their advantage.
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