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If you’re seeing the wrong currency appearing across Google services, it could be due to incorrect locale settings in your Google account. We’re going to show you how to set the correct locale on Google.

Fixing the locale will make your life easier when using services such as Google Sheets, where you won’t have to select the correct currency every time you open a new spreadsheet. With the correct locale selected, you will also see more content in your preferred language in Google search results.

RELATED: The Beginner's Guide to Google Sheets

Set the Default Currency for All Spreadsheets in Google Sheets

The default currency settings in Google Sheets is linked to the preferred language in your Google account. To make sure that the correct currency is selected as the default, you need to go to the language settings page for your Google account and click the pencil icon under the “Preferred Language” section.

Type your preferred language in the search box. If you want to select the U.S. dollar as the default currency, select “English.”

Select English as the preferred language for your Google account

Now, select “United States.”

Click United States to select English (US) as the default language for your Google account

Once you’ve done this, the default currency will be set to U.S. dollars.

Check Whether the Correct Currency Is Set as the Default

You can use Google Sheets to check whether the correct currency is set as the default across your Google account. Go to https://docs.google.com/spreadsheets/ and create a new spreadsheet.

Click Format > Number and check the symbol next to “Currency.” This should reflect the currency symbol for the language that you selected in your Google account. For example, if you selected English (United States) as the language, you’ll see the U.S. dollar symbol (“$”) here.

Click Currency under Format > Number in Google Sheets

In case you see the wrong currency symbol here, you should check again to see whether the preferred language for your Google account is correct.

It’s worth remembering that setting the default currency on your Google account does not automatically change the currencies selected in older spreadsheets in Google Sheets. These changes will only apply to the new sheets you create after changing the preferred language.

Change the Currency for One Google Sheet

Having set the default currency, if you want to change it for just one particular spreadsheet, here’s what you need to do.

Open a new spreadsheet in Google Sheets and go to File > Spreadsheet settings.

Click Spreadsheet settings under the File menu in Google Sheets

Click the “General” tab in the “Settings for this spreadsheet” box.

Click the General tab under Settings for this spreadsheet

Under “Locale,” select the region whose currency you want to use as the default.

Click United States to set the default currency in Google Sheets

Click “Save settings” when you’re done. This will change the default currency and date format for this spreadsheet.

Click Save settings

Set Cells to “Currency” Format in Google Sheets

To avoid typing the currency symbol again and again, you can set cells to “Currency” format in Google Sheets. To do this, select the cells that you want to change to the currency format.

Selecting multiple cells in Google Sheets

In the menu, select Format > Number.

Click Number in the Format menu in Google Sheets

Click “Currency.”

Click Currency under Format > Number in Google Sheets

From this moment on, you just have to type the number in all of these cells and Google Sheets will automatically add the correct currency symbol.

Once you’ve mastered this, you might want to try learning all the best Google Sheets keyboard shortcuts.

RELATED: All the Best Google Sheets Keyboard Shortcuts

Pranay Parab Pranay Parab
Pranay Parab has been a technology journalist for over 10 years, during which time he's written well over 500 tutorials, and covered everything from social media apps to enterprise software. Pranay lives in Mumbai, India, and is currently pursuing an MBA.
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