A wrapped package and Amazon gift card.
Nicole Glass Photography/Shutterstock.com

If you share an Amazon account with your partner—or let other people use your Prime login—you might occasionally want to hide an order from your history. That way, you won’t spoil the surprise of a birthday gift, or your kids won’t see something they shouldn’t when shopping for school supplies. Here’s how to do it.

How to Archive or Hide an Order on Amazon

Log in to Amazon and click Returns & Orders in the top-right corner.

returns and orders option

This will show you a list of all the things you’ve ordered in the past three months. Scroll through the list until you find the order that you want to hide and click “View Order Details.” If you don’t see it, use the search bar to find it.

amazon orders list

For the item that you want to hide, click “Archive Order.”

archive order highlighted

Then, click “Archive Order” again. Everything you ordered at the same time will also be archived.

archive order pop up

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Now, when someone looks at the list of your orders, it won’t appear. It is still accessible, however, in the order archive.

You can access it on Amazon’s Archived Orders page. To find it on Amazon’s website, go to Accounts & Lists > Your Account. Under “Ordering and Shopping Preferences,” click “Archived Orders.”

amazon order archive

Set up Amazon Household Instead

Archiving orders to a little-known section of the user interface isn’t a great solution, to be honest. Sure, it works, but someone who’s curious could still easily find the order details. Instead, if you have Amazon Prime, there’s a much better solution: Amazon Household.

amazon household information

Amazon Household lets you share your Prime benefits and digital content with another adult and up to four teens and children. This means that both you and your partner can have your own Amazon accounts, order each other whatever secret gifts you like, and get the same free delivery options—without paying for a second Prime account. No more account-sharing needed.

It also means that you can set your teenage kids up with their own Amazon accounts so that they can order things with your approval, but they won’t be able to pry through your order list to see what they’re getting for Christmas.

To set up an Amazon Household, head to the Amazon Household page and follow our full walkthrough.

Profile Photo for Harry Guinness Harry Guinness
Harry Guinness is a photography expert and writer with nearly a decade of experience. His work has been published in newspapers like The New York Times and on a variety of other websites, from Lifehacker to Popular Science and Medium's OneZero.
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