Bluetooth headphones laying next to a Mac
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Bluetooth accessories often have long and complex default names that are hard to keep track of. On your Mac, thankfully, you have the option to rename a Bluetooth device to whatever you want—even an emoji. Here’s how.

First, click the Apple logo found in the top-left corner of your Mac’s screen.

Click Apple logo on Mac desktop

Select “System Preferences” from the dropdown menu.

Visit system preferences on Mac

Head into the “Bluetooth” settings.

Visit Bluetooth system preferences on Mac

You can only edit the names of Bluetooth accessories that are connected to your Mac at the moment.

RELATED: How to Set Up a Bluetooth Keyboard or Mouse on Your Mac

Once the wireless device is connected, right-click its existing title from the list of paired accessories and select the “Rename” option.

Click Rename option in macOS Bluetooth settings

In the pop-up’s text field, enter the new name for your Bluetooth device. It can be as long as 64 characters and as brief as an emoji. You can press the Command+Control+Space keyboard shortcut to bring up the emoji picker.

RELATED: How to Type Emoji on Your Mac with a Keyboard Shortcut

Click the “Rename” button to save the new name. This update won’t be immediately reflected on the quick settings available in the menu bar. For that, you’ll have to reboot your Mac.

Rename Bluetooth device on Mac

You can perform this process to update any Bluetooth-enabled device’s name on your Mac, including wireless keyboards, mice, headphones, and more.

Bluetooth settings on macOS

Note: Your device’s new name will remain restricted to your Mac. It will show up in its default label when you use it with a different computer or phone.

In addition, Apple warns that if you pair your Bluetooth accessory with another Mac, it might reset to its original name.


There are several more Bluetooth preferences you can look into to improve your wireless device experience on a Mac. You can force macOS to use the high-definition aptX or AAC codes, access Bluetooth options from the menu bar, and more.

Shubham Agarwal Shubham Agarwal
Shubham is a freelance technology journalist from Ahmedabad, India. He has been covering technology for over four years for publications such as Digital Trends, HuffPost, Lifehacker, and more. When he's not writing about whatever's trending in the world of technology, you will find him either exploring a new city with his camera, binge-reading non-fiction books, and novels or playing the latest game on his PlayStation.
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