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If you want to support your favorite Twitch streamers, you could think about hosting them on your own channel. Doing this allows you to repeat the stream to your followers and friends, giving it greater exposure.

You can host any channel on Twitch, from the smallest part-time streamers to the well-known, full-timers. It costs you nothing, and if you’re thinking about streaming on Twitch yourself, could help you network with other Twitch users who’ll (hopefully) host you back.

RELATED: How to Stream a PC Game on Twitch with OBS

How to Host Other Streamers On Twitch

It’s easy to host other Twitch streams on your own Twitch channel. To do so, you’ll need to head to your channel profile.

Each Twitch user has a Twitch channel—even users who don’t stream themselves. This is where you can stream and chat with your followers as well as issue commands to control your channel (including hosting other streamers).

Using Twitch Online or Desktop App

To access your Twitch channel to begin hosting, click the account icon in the top-right corner of the Twitch interface on the website and in the desktop app, and then click the “Channel” option.

To access your Twitch channel, tap the channel icon in the top-right. From the drop down, click the "Channel" option.

Once you’re on your channel page, you’ll need to access your chat.

This should appear on the right-hand side of your channel page in the Twitch desktop app and website.

An example of the Twitch chat room for a channel on the Twitch website

If it isn’t, click the “Chat” option in the menu below your stream (or stream placeholder, if you’re not currently streaming yourself) to access it.

Click "Chat" to access your channel's Twitch chat.

Using Twitch Mobile App

On iPhone, iPad, and Android devices, you can access your channel by tapping the channel icon in the top-left corner of the app.

In the Twitch mobile app, tap the channel icon in the top-left.

On your channel profile, tap the “Chat” option in the menu to access your channel’s chat room.

In your channel profile, click the "Chat" option.

Hosting Other Twitch Users

To begin hosting a channel, type /host stream in your own chat, replacing stream with the streamer’s username.

For instance, to host the Twitch Gaming channel, you’d type /host twitchgaming to begin hosting it. These commands work on all platforms, including on mobile and desktop devices.

The Twitch host command, shown in the Twitch chat on the Twitch website.

If successful, you should see the hosted stream appear. A message will appear below your own username, telling you that you’re hosting the stream.

An indication of a Twitch channel hosting on a Twitch channel profile.

You can switch between streams using this command around three times per 30-minute period to prevent abuse.

If you want to stop hosting a Twitch streamer, type /unhost to stop.

The Twitch unhost command, shown in the Twitch chat on the Twitch website

A message will appear in chat to confirm that your channel’s hosting of that stream has ended.

Using Twitch Auto-Hosting

If you have channels that you want to regularly support, you could use the Twitch auto-hosting feature. This allows you to set a number of approved channels that you wish to host automatically when your own stream is offline.

If you’ve just ended a stream, Twitch will wait three minutes before it activates the auto host feature. This is to give you time to reestablish your own stream if you’ve lost connection, for instance. You’ll also immediately stop hosting another channel if you start streaming yourself.

To use Twitch auto hosting, you’ll need to access your Twitch channel settings. Unfortunately, you can’t change your auto-hosting settings on mobile devices.

To do this, head to the Twitch website (or open the Twitch desktop app) and click the account icon in the top-right corner. From the drop-down menu, click the “Channel” option.

To access your Twitch channel, tap the channel icon in the top-right. From the drop down, click the "Channel" option.

On your channel profile, click the “Customize Channel” button to access your settings.

On your Twitch channel profile, click the "Customize Channel" button.

In your Twitch channel settings, scroll down until you see the “Auto Hosting” section. To enable auto hosting, tap the “Auto Hosting Channels” slider to enable the feature.

Tap the slider next to the "Auto host channels" option to enable auto hosting on your Twitch account.

You can set the priority in which channels are hosted from this list under the “Hosting Priority” section.

To host randomly, select the “Host channels randomly from the list” option. If you want to host based on a list order, select the “Host channels by the order they appear in the list” option instead.

Select your Twitch auto host priority settings under the "Hosting Priority" section.

To add Twitch channels to the auto hosting list, click the “Host List” option.

Click "Host List" to access your Twitch auto hosting channel list.

Use the search bar on the auto-hosting list page to find and add new channels to the list. For example, searching for “twitchgaming” will find and list the official Twitch Gaming channel.

To add a channel to the list, click the “Add” button next to the channel name.

Search for a Twitch channel to add, then click the "Add" button to add it to your auto hosting list.

Once added, you can remove channels from the list by hovering over them and clicking the “Remove” button.

To remove a channel from the Twitch auto host list, hover over the channel name in the list and click the "Remove" button to remove it.

This will remove the channel from your auto-hosting list. You’ll need to add it again if you want to see Twitch automatically host this channel for you in the future.

Ben Stockton Ben Stockton
Ben Stockton is a freelance tech writer from the United Kingdom. In a past life, he was a UK college lecturer, training teens and adults. Since leaving the classroom, he's been a tech writer, writing how-to articles and tutorials for MakeUseOf, MakeTechEasier, and Cloudwards.net. He has a degree in History and a postgraduate qualification in Computing.
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