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Compressing images in your Microsoft PowerPoint presentation can help reduce the overall file size of the presentation and save disk space on the device it’s stored on. Here’s how to compress images in Microsoft PowerPoint.

Note that this feature is only available for desktop versions of Office and not Office for the web.

Compress Images in PowerPoint for Windows

Open the PowerPoint presentation that contains the images you’d like to compress and then select a photo.

Selected image in PowerPoint

Once selected, you’ll automatically be in the “Picture Format” tab. Here, click the “Compress Pictures” button in the “Adjust” group.

Compress pictures in adjust group

The “Compress Pictures” window will appear. In the “Compression Options” group, you can choose if the compression applies only to the selected picture. If you uncheck this option, PowerPoint will compress all of the images in the presentation, which overrides any changes you may have made to those images.

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In the “Resolution” group, choose which resolution you would like to use. Once ready, click “OK.”

Apply compression to image

The image or images will now be compressed.

Compress Images in PowerPoint for Mac

Open the PowerPoint presentation that contains the images you’d like to compress and then select a photo. Once selected, click “Compress Pictures” in the “Picture Format” tab.

Compress pictures in Mac

The “Compress Pictures” window will appear. Select the picture quality you’d like to use, then select if you’d like to apply the compression to all images in the presentation or only the selected image. Also, if you want to delete the cropped areas of the pictures, check the box next to that option.

When ready, click “OK.”

Apply compression to images in Mac

The image or images will now be compressed.

Marshall Gunnell Marshall Gunnell
Marshall Gunnell is a writer with experience in the data storage industry. He worked at Synology, and most recently as CMO and technical staff writer at StorageReview. He's currently an API/Software Technical Writer at LINE Corporation in Tokyo, Japan.
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