The Adobe Photoshop logo.

You don’t need to use the full range of Photoshop features to create or edit your images. One of the simplest tasks is adding or editing text to images in Photoshop. Here’s how to do it.

Adding Text in Photoshop

On the left side of the Photoshop window is the toolbar, with a horizontal list of features and tools you can use to manipulate your image.

To add text, click the T icon or press T on your keyboard. This will select the standard, horizontal text typing tool by default.

Click the T icon.

Click the arrow in the bottom-right corner of the T icon to change the text editing tool. This opens a side menu with other options, including vertical text and text masks.

Select an option to switch to it.

Click the arrow in the bottom-right corner of the T icon.

Now, select the area of the image canvas in which you want to place your text. Click the area to place a text box in that position.

Click the area on the canvas where you want to place your text box.

Editing Text in Photoshop

Newer versions of Photoshop insert “Lorem Ipsum” as placeholder text in your text box. This allows you to see the current color and font. If you’re happy with it, delete the sample text and type what you want to insert.

If you want to change the formatting, click the inserted text box.

Click the text box to edit the formatting.

The options bar at the top changes and displays formatting options.

The text options bar in Photoshop.

To switch from horizontal to vertical text, select your text box, and then click the T icon with the horizontal and vertical arrows.

Click the T icon with the horizontal and vertical arrows.

Select a new font or text emphasis from one of the drop-down menus.

Select an emphasis option from the drop-down menu.

Further to the right, click the arrow next to the small and large T icon to select a new text size from the drop-down menu.

Click the arrow next to the double-A icon to open the drop-down menu and change how crisp or smooth you want your text to be.

Click the arrow next to the small and large T icon to change the text size, and click the arrow next to the double-A icon to change how crisp or smooth your text should be.

You can also select the text alignment and color from the icons and menus to the left of the text smoothness options.

If you want to “warp” the text into a different shape, click the T with half-circle under it at the far-right of the options bar.

Select a text alignment option, color, and/or warp option.

In the “Warp Text” menu, select the style and bend you want your text to be, and then click “OK.”

Select the style and bend, and then click "OK."

Deleting Text in Photoshop

If you want to delete text in Photoshop, simply select the text box until the blinking cursor appears under the text layer. Then, press Backspace to delete the text.

A text box with the placeholder text selected in Photoshop.

To remove the text box entirely, you have to access the “Layers” panel, which is usually in the menus on the right. However, if you don’t see the “Layers” panel, click Window > Layers, or press F7.

Click "Window" and then select "Layers."

Photoshop layers are the different pieces of your image canvas. Text, shapes, and other layers remain separate, but they’re stacked on top of each other. This allows you to make changes to one aspect of your image while leaving the other elements alone.

RELATED: What Are Layers and Masks in Photoshop?

A text layer will have a T icon, and it’s usually named the same as the text it contains.

If you want to hide a text layer from view while you edit other parts of an image, click the Eye icon next to the text layer in the “Layers” panel.

Click the Eye icon next to a layer to hide it.

To delete a layer from your canvas completely, right-click it in the “Layers” panel, and then select “Delete Layer.”

Click "Delete Layer."

If you accidentally delete a layer, or delete the wrong one, just press Ctrl+Z (Cmd+Z on a Mac) to restore it. You can also click Edit > Undo to restore a deleted layer.

Ben Stockton Ben Stockton
Ben Stockton is a freelance tech writer from the United Kingdom. In a past life, he was a UK college lecturer, training teens and adults. Since leaving the classroom, he's been a tech writer, writing how-to articles and tutorials for MakeUseOf, MakeTechEasier, and Cloudwards.net. He has a degree in History and a postgraduate qualification in Computing.
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