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The Picture-in-Picture (PiP) extension for Google Chrome lets you play any video in Picture-in-Picture (PiP) mode, and it works on all platforms. PiP is a popped-out, always-on-top video player that floats on top of other windows. You can also reposition it along the screen border while you continue to surf the internet.

Why Use an Extension When PiP is Built-In?

Chrome 70 added a built-in PiP feature you can access with a right-click. While you could continue to use this without having to install the extension, it’s a bit annoying to access at times. For example, on some sites (like YouTube), you have to right-click the video, and then right-click the video again to see the option.

RELATED: Chrome 70 Has Picture-in-Picture Now, Here's How It Works

Right-click the video, and then ricght-click the video again to see this context menu with Picture-in-Picture mode

Additionally, while the built-in PiP mode works on most websites, it fails to work on others, such as DailyMotion and Twitter.

When you install the Chrome extension, all you have to do to enable Picture-in-Picture mode is click the icon in the toolbar, and the mini player appears instantly. It also lets you use the feature on sites that you weren’t able to with the built-in option. The PiP extension is also open-source, so you can dig through the code if you’re the curious type.

How to Install the Picture-in-Picture Extension

Fire up Chrome and head to the Chrome web store for the extension, and then click “Add to Chrome.”

Click "Add to Chrome."

Next, review the permissions required by the extension, and then click “Add Extension.”

Click "Add Extension."

After the extension installs, a confirmation appears, notifying you it was added to Chrome.

The notification that the extension successfully installed to Chrome.

The PiP extension works on virtually any website that has videos, from YouTube to Facebook. All you have to do to pop a video out and throw it on top of other windows is click the PiP extension icon or press Alt+P (Option+P on Mac).

Click the Picture-in-Picture extension icon.

Once activated, the area where the video would typically plays goes black and displays “Playing in picture-in-picture mode.” A small video player now floats on top of the window.

The floating Picture-in-Picture video screen.

To resize the player, click-and-drag the icon in the top-left corner. You can resize it to roughly a quarter of your screen.

Click-and-drag the top left corner to resize the PiP window

You can move the player, too—simply drag it anywhere on the screen. Unfortunately, the player automatically docks itself to the edge of the screen if you try to move it anywhere in the middle.

After you finish the video, click either the “X” to close it or the icon at the bottom right to return to the tab where it’s playing.

Click either the X to close the video or the icon in the bottom right to return to the tab where it's playing.

It’s worth noting that PiP only works with one video at a time. If a video is already playing and you enable PiP on a second one, that video will replace the one currently playing.

So, from now on, if you’re watching a video and still want to surf the Net, just give this bad boy a click, and it will pop right out.

Brady Gavin Brady Gavin
Brady Gavin has been immersed in technology for 15 years and has written over 150 detailed tutorials and explainers. He's covered everything from Windows 10 registry hacks to Chrome browser tips. Brady has a diploma in Computer Science from Camosun College in Victoria, BC.  
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