Amazon Prime logo

Amazon Prime normally costs $119 per year unless you can score a discounted Prime membership. If you’re ready to give up free two-day shipping, the Amazon Prime Video library, Prime Day, and other perks, here’s how you can quit Prime.

Here’s the good news: You might be able to score a refund if you’re paid for Prime but haven’t used your benefits in this period. So, if Amazon just automatically renewed your Prime subscription and charged you, you may be able to get your money back. Even if you can’t get a refund, you can cancel Prime and you’ll keep your benefits until the end of your paid membership period. Amazon won’t automatically charge you to renew.

To get started, head to Amazon’s website. Sign in with your Amazon account if you’re not already signed in. Mouse over “Account & Lists” near the top right corner of the page and click “Your Prime Membership.”

Option to manage Prime membership on Amazon.com

Click the “End Membership and Benefits” link under Membership Management at the left side of the page. This begins the process of canceling your membership.

Option to end Prime membership benefits on Amazon.com

Amazon will remind you what you’re giving up. You can click “End My Benefits” and go through the prompts to continue the cancellation process.

Amazon's Prime cancellation wizard

Finally, you’ll be prompted to confirm the cancellation of your membership. Your membership won’t actually end until the end of the period you’ve paid for.

You may be offered a refund here. Amazon notes that you will get a full refund of your current membership period if you haven’t used the benefits yet.

Option to cancel Prime auto-renewal on Amazon.com

RELATED: How to Score a Cheap Amazon Prime Subscription for Prime Day

Chris Hoffman Chris Hoffman
Chris Hoffman is Editor in Chief of How-To Geek. He's written about technology for nearly a decade and was a PCWorld columnist for two years. Chris has written for The New York Times, been interviewed as a technology expert on TV stations like Miami's NBC 6, and had his work covered by news outlets like the BBC. Since 2011, Chris has written over 2,000 articles that have been read more than 500 million times---and that's just here at How-To Geek.
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