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Inserting a hyperlink in a PowerPoint presentation is great for quick access to external resources relevant to your content. However, the underline that comes with it may distract the audience from the message of the slide. Here’s how to remove it.

Removing the Underline From Hyperlink Text

While PowerPoint doesn’t have a specific option for removing the underline from hyperlink text, there’s a very simple workaround. What we’re going to do is remove the link from the text, place an invisible shape over that text, and then add the link to that shape.

Go ahead and open your presentation, move to the slide that contains the underlined hyperlink text, and locate that text.

Right-click the text and select “Remove Link” from the list of options.

Next, head over to the “Insert” tab and click the “Shapes” button.

A drop-down menu will appear, presenting several different shapes. Go ahead and select the first rectangle in the “Rectangles” group.

Click and drag to draw a rectangle, completely covering the text from which you removed the hyperlink.

A new “Format” tab will appear in the “Drawing Tools” tab group.

On this tab, click the “Shape Fill” button

On the drop-down menu, select “No fill.”

Now repeat these steps for the shape’s outline. Click the “Shape Outline” button.

Then select “No Outline.”

Next, click the edge of the shape to select it. Even though the shape has no outline or fill now, it shouldn’t be hard since we know where the shape is. Just watch for the cursor change to find it.

With the shape selected head over to the “Insert” tab and click the “Link” button.

On the drop-down, select “Insert Link.”

A new window will appear. Copy the destination URL in the address bar and then click “OK.”

It’s always a good idea to make sure everything works before stepping in front of your audience to give your presentation. Go ahead and preview the slideshow to make sure that the link is working properly.

Marshall Gunnell
Marshall Gunnell is a writer with experience in the data storage industry. He worked at Synology, and most recently as CMO and technical staff writer at StorageReview. He's currently an API/Software Technical Writer at LINE Corporation in Tokyo, Japan, runs ITEnterpriser, a data-storage and cybersecurity-focused online media, and plays with development, with his RAID calculator being his first public project.
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