In the Windows 10 October 2018 Update, Edge received a performance boost that lets it pre-launch processes and preload the Start and New Tabs during Windows startup. If you don’t use Edge, though, these optimizations are wasting resource and slowing startup. With a quick Registry hack or Group Policy setting, you can disable it.

All Windows 10 Users: Prevent Pre-Launching and Preloading by Editing the Registry

If you have Windows Home edition, you will have to use Registry Editor to make these changes. You can also do it this way if you have Windows Pro or Enterprise, but feel more comfortable working in the Registry. (If you have Pro or Enterprise, though, we recommend using the easier Local Group Policy Editor, as described later in the article.)

Standard warning: Registry Editor is a powerful tool and misusing it can render your system unstable or even inoperable. This is a pretty simple hack, and as long as you stick to the instructions, you shouldn’t have any problems. That said, if you’ve never worked with it before, consider reading about how to use the Registry Editor before you get started. And definitely back up the Registry (and your computer!) before making changes.

To do this, you’re going to have to make two separate edits in the Registry: one to prevent pre-launching of processes and another to prevent preloading of the start and new tab pages. We’ll take them one at a time.

Prevent Pre-Launching of Microsoft Edge Processes

To get started, open the Registry Editor by hitting Start and typing “regedit.” Press Enter to open Registry Editor and then permit it to make changes to your PC.

In the Registry Editor, use the left sidebar to navigate to the following key (or copy and paste it into the Registry Editor address bar):

HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SOFTWARE\Policies\Microsoft\MicrosoftEdge\Main

Now, right-click on the main key and choose New > DWORD (32-bit) Value. Name the new value AllowPrelaunch.

Now, you’re going to modify that value. Double-click the new AllowPrelaunch value, set the value to 0 in the “Value data” box, and then click “OK.”

You can change back to the default behavior later by going back and changing that AllowPrelaunch value to 1.

Prevent Preloading of Start and New Tabs

In the Registry Editor, use the left sidebar to navigate to the following key (or copy and paste it into the Registry Editor address bar):

HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SOFTWARE\Policies\Microsoft\MicrosoftEdge

Right-click the MicrosoftEdge folder and choose New > Key. Name the new key TabPreloader.

Now, right-click on the TabPreloader key and choose New > DWORD (32-bit) Value. Name the new value AllowTabPreloading.

Now, you’re going to modify that value. Double-click the new AllowTabPreloading value, set the value to 0 in the “Value data” box, and then click “OK.”

You can now exit Registry Editor. For the changes to take effect, you’ll need to restart your computer. To change things back to the default behavior, you can go back and set that AllowTabPreloading value to 1.

Download Our One-Click Registry Hack

If you don’t feel like diving into the Registry yourself, we’ve created some Registry hacks you can use. Just download and extract the following ZIP file:

PreventPreloadingAndPre-LaunchingOfMicrosoftEdge

Inside you’ll find REG files for disabling pre-launching and preloading. Once extracted, double-click the file you want and accept the prompts asking whether you’re sure you want to make changes to your Registry. You’ll also find files for re-enabling both features.

These hacks work by adding the AllowPrelaunch and AllowTabPreloading values to the MicrosoftEdge key we talked about in the previous section. We created them by making the changes in our own Registry and then exporting just those changes to a REG file. Running the hacks modifies the values in your Registry. And if you enjoy fiddling with the Registry, it’s worth taking the time to learn how to make your own Registry hacks.

RELATED: How to Make Your Own Windows Registry Hacks

Pro and Enterprise Users: Prevent Pre-Launching and Preloading Using Group Policy

If you’re using Windows Pro or Enterprise, the easiest way to disable pre-launching Edge and preloading of the Start and New Tab pages is by using the Local Group Policy Editor. It’s a pretty powerful tool, so if you’ve never used it before, it’s worth taking some time to learn what it can do. Also, if you’re on a company network, do everyone a favor and check with your admin first. If your work computer is part of a domain, it’s also likely that it’s part of a domain group policy that will supersede the local group policy, anyway.

Note: To make these changes in the Local Group Policy Editor you must be running Windows 10 Pro (or Enterprise) version 1809 or later for pre-launching of Microsoft Edge processes, and version 1803 or later for preloading Start and New Tab page.

In Windows Pro or Enterprise, fire up the Local Group Policy Editor by hitting Start, typing “gpedit.msc” into the search box, and then pressing Enter.

In the left-hand pane of the Local Group Policy Editor window, drill down to Local Computer Policy > Computer Configuration > Administrative Templates > Windows Components > Microsoft Edge. On the right, look for the “Allow Microsoft Edge pre-launch at Windows startup, when the system is idle, and each time Microsoft Edge is closed” and “Allow Microsoft Edge to start and load the Start and New Tab page at Windows startup and each time Microsoft Edge is closed” items. You’ll be double-clicking each one in turn and making the same change in each.

When you open either setting, select the “Disabled” option and then click “OK.”

After disabling both options, you can exit the Local Group Policy Editor. You’ll need to restart your PC for the changes to take effect. If you want to re-enable either feature, use the editor to set the items back to “Not Configured.”

Brady Gavin Brady Gavin
Brady Gavin has been immersed in technology for 15 years and has written over 150 detailed tutorials and explainers. He's covered everything from Windows 10 registry hacks to Chrome browser tips. Brady has a diploma in Computer Science from Camosun College in Victoria, BC.  
Read Full Bio »