How to Change Your Facebook Password

Most people use terrible passwords. If you’re one of them, you should change all your important passwords to something a lot more secure—and believe it or not, that incldues Facebook.

Facebook may seem like a silly time waster, but it’s quickly becoming a crucial service. If someone has access to your Facebook account, they have a huge amount of your personal data, can probably log in to lots of other websites and services pretending to be you, and can even scam your friends. So you should keep it protected. Here’s how to change your Facebook password.

On the Web

Log in to Facebook and go to Settings > Security and Login. You can get there directly with this link.

Click Edit next to Change Password; it’s in the Login section.

Enter your Current Password and your new password twice. If it’s too short, weak, or the confirmation doesn’t match, Facebook will notify you.

When you’ve got a strong password, click Save Changes. You’ll be asked if you want to stay logged in on all your other devices. If you think your account has been hacked, select Log Out of Other Devices. Otherwise, you’re okay to go with Stay Logged In.

And that’s it, your password is changed.

On iOS or Android

Open the Facebook app and go to Settings > Account Settings.

Next, go to Security and Login and select Change Password.

Enter your Current Password and then your new password twice and click Save Changes and your new password will be saved.


A good password is only one part of having a secure Facebook account. You should also check out our guide on some of the other things you can do to make it as secure as possible. If you’re struggling to remember your passwords or use secure ones, you should also consider using a password manager.

Harry Guinness writes occasionally when he’s not busy skiing, sailing, partying, lifting weights, or otherwise dodging responsibility. His main areas of interest are himself, gin, and crazy people with interesting stories to tell. When people won’t pay him to write ill-thought-out opinion pieces, he covers photography, technology, and culture. You can follow him on Twitter.