How to Post Panoramas to Instagram

Now that you can post multiple photos at once to Instagram, people are starting to take advantage of the feature. If you crop a large panorama seamlessly, you can post the different segments as multiple photos and get a swipeable panorama.

The resulting image looks like this. By swiping left and right you can view the whole image.

While you can make your own swipeable panorama with any image editor, it takes a bit of time to get right. The simplest way is to use an app dedicated to the purpose. There are a few out there and, fair warning, most of them aren’t great.

The best app I’ve found is InSwipe for Android. You can cut photos into up to 10 pieces, and the app doesn’t add a watermark.

On iOS, your choice is harder. Swipeable makes it easier to remove the watermark the app ties to your image, but the app won’t let you control how many pieces each panorama is cropped into. Unsquared lets you control how many pieces, but to remove the watermark you need to watch a 30 second video ad. If you find a better app, please let us know in the comments.

All the apps work pretty much the same so I’m going to demo it with InSwipe for Android.

Download the app you’re going to use and open it. Tap the “Gallery” button (or “Import from Camera Roll,” or whatever button allows you to load an image into your app).

If you can, select the number of pieces you want the image cropped into. If the app is trying to add watermarks, remove them if you want to. In Swipable, just tap on the image a few times. In Unsquared, tap the “X” on the watermark, and then wait for the video to end.

Click “Continue” or “Done,” wait for the app to do its thing, and then save your image.

Posting the panorama is just like posting any group of photos to Instagram. Open Instagram, create a new a post, tap the album icon, and then select the images you want to upload. Make sure to select them in the right order so that the panorama works.

Post the image, and you’re done. You’ve got a swipeable panorama for everyone to see.

Harry Guinness writes occasionally when he’s not busy skiing, sailing, partying, lifting weights, or otherwise dodging responsibility. His main areas of interest are himself, gin, and crazy people with interesting stories to tell. When people won’t pay him to write ill-thought-out opinion pieces, he covers photography, technology, and culture. You can follow him on Twitter.