How to View Your Chromebook’s Hardware Specifications and System Information

chromebook

Google doesn’t provide an easy way to see the storage, RAM, CPU, and other specifications of your Chromebook. But it’s possible to dig all this information up, just as you could on a traditional computer operating system.

The specifications matter if you’re considering upgrading your Chromebook and want to know how much hardware you have. This will also tell you if you have an ARM or Intel CPU, which is important if you’re installing a full Linux system on your Chromebook.

Check Available Storage

To view how much local storage your Chrome OS device has available, open the “Files” app and click the menu button. You’ll see a meter saying how much local storage space you have left. You can free up space by deleting files from your Downloads folder and clearing your cache.

View Memory, CPU, and Network Usage

Chrome has its own task manager on Chrome OS, too. To open it, open a Chrome window, click the menu button, point to “More Tools”, and select “Task Manager”. The task manager will show you how much memory, CPU, and network activity different web pages, browser extensions, and apps are using.

Use the System Page

Chrome OS offers a special page that shows all of this information. You don’t need to install anything extra to find it. Unfrotunately, this isn’t the most user-friendly interface.

To locate this interface, type “chrome://system” into Chrome’s address bar and press Enter. (You can open this page on Windows, Mac, or Linux, too — but Chrome won’t show anywhere near as much system information.)

Much of the information here will be more technical than what most people need, but you can see detailed information about your release version of Chrome OS, the device’s CPU, disk usage, its hardware platform, and network connection information.

Examine Network Connection Details

If you need to know your Chromebook’s network connection information — for example, its current IP address, its MAC address, or your router’s IP address — you can find this information in an easier way.

First, open the Settings page. You can do this by clicking the menu button in a Chrome browser window and selecting “Settings”, or by clicking the notification area and selecting Settings”.

Click the name of your network connection under “Internet connection” at the top of the Settings window and then click your connection name in the list. This information will be displayed on the “Connection” and “Network” tabs.

Find Your Chromebook’s Name with the Recovery Utility

Google offers a Chromebook Recovery Utility you can install on your Chromebook. Install this, launch it, and it will help you “Identify your Chromebook.” This app will display the exact model name of your Chromebook and match it to a more user-friendly name, allowing you to pinpoint the name of the Chromebook you’re using. You can then Google this Chromebook name for more information, if you like.

This utility is also essential for restoring your Chromebook’s operating system if it’s become damaged.

Install a System Information App

Google has added a variety of system APIs to Chrome OS, so simple apps can read system information and display it. Google hasn’t included such an interface with the operating system because it really doesn’t want you to have to care what hardware is in your Chromebook. These apps function like system information utilities like Speccy do on Windows.

For example, you could install Cog, a system information utility created by François Beaufort, a Google employee.

Cog will show you the name of your CPU and architecture, your current system CPU usage, the total amount of RAM in your system, the amount of memory left, network connection information, display specifications, and a few other details. Other apps work similarly, as there’s only so much information an app can get from Chrome OS and display to you.


If necessary, more detailed hardware specifications can be found with a simple Google search after you find the exact model name of your Chromebook.

Image Credit: llcatta86 dotcom on Flickr

Chris Hoffman is a technology writer and all-around computer geek. He's as at home using the Linux terminal as he is digging into the Windows registry. Connect with him on Google+.