is-it-possible-to-burn-an-iso-image-to-a-dvd-using-the-command-line-00

People like to work using the Command Line in Windows for various reasons, but is it possible to burn an ISO image to DVD using the Command Line? Today’s SuperUser Q&A post helps a reader get his ISO images burned to DVDs with ease.

Today’s Question & Answer session comes to us courtesy of SuperUser—a subdivision of Stack Exchange, a community-driven grouping of Q&A web sites.

Screenshot courtesy of MDT Guy (SuperUser).

The Question

SuperUser reader Avinash Raj wants to know if it is possible to burn an ISO image to a DVD using the Command Line in Windows:

Is it possible to burn an ISO file to a DVD using the Command Line in Windows 7 or 8? If it is, then how would I do it?

Is it possible to burn an ISO image to a DVD using the Command Line in Windows?

The Answer

SuperUser contributor MDT Guy has the answer for us:

Yes, it is possible to burn ISO files to DVDs from the Windows Command Line, however, you can only do so in Windows 7 and later versions.

How to Burn an Image from the Command Line in Windows

ISO and IMG image files can be burned in Windows using the Command Line quite easily. First, open the Command Prompt and then type isoburn to access the quick syntax guide. As has been noted in other comments (see thread link below), you do not need to reference the .exe extension since isoburn lives in the System32 folder.

is-it-possible-to-burn-an-iso-image-to-a-dvd-using-the-command-line-01

Start isoburn.exe using the following command and parameters:

Syntax

  • isoburn.exe /q [the CD/DVD writing drive]

Example

  • isoburn.exe /q D: C:\Users\JDoe\Desktop\image.iso

is-it-possible-to-burn-an-iso-image-to-a-dvd-using-the-command-line-02

After a few moments you will see:

is-it-possible-to-burn-an-iso-image-to-a-dvd-using-the-command-line-03

While the process can be fired up from the Command Line, this window may still need to be closed manually.

See Also: How to Burn Disk Images (ISO & IMG) in Windows 7 & Windows 8


Have something to add to the explanation? Sound off in the comments. Want to read more answers from other tech-savvy Stack Exchange users? Check out the full discussion thread here.