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Microsoft’s Office Online is a completely free, web-based version of Microsoft Office. This online office suite is clearly competing with Google Docs, but it’s also a potential replacement for the desktop version of Office.

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Screencasting can seem a bit daunting at first. Open Broadcaster Software is a powerful, free program that will do everything you need, but you’ll need a few minutes to learn its interface.

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There’s no need to huddle around the same computer or send files back and forth over email if you want to collaborate with other people. You can all edit the same copy of the document — you can even edit it together in real time.

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Microsoft recently announced their intention to change SkyDrive’s name to OneDrive and add new features in the process. Well, today is the day when it has all gone live. Now you can tuck into all the new OneDrive goodness and even earn extra storage for free!

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Windows Activation, introduced in Windows XP, checks in with Microsoft when you install Windows or get a new Windows PC. This is an anti-piracy feature — it’s designed to annoy you if you’re using a non-genuine copy of Windows.

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If there’s one complaint nearly everyone seems to have about Windows, it’s that it wants to reboot so frequently. Whether it’s for Windows updates or just when installing, uninstalling, or updating software, Windows will often ask to reboot.

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The Xbox 360 controller has become the gold standard for PC gaming. Yes, the specific type of controller is important — you don’t want another brand of controller or even an Xbox One controller.

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You don’t need Microsoft Office to put together a professional-looking resume. Google Docs is completely free and offers a variety of resume templates, so you can focus on highlighting your skills instead of fiddling with formatting.

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Dear How-To Geek,

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HTTPS, which uses SSL, provides identity verification and security, so you know you’re connected to the correct website and no one can eavesdrop on you. That’s the theory, anyway. In practice, SSL on the web is kind of a mess.

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There are two types of mixed content — one is worse than the other, but neither is good. Mixed content warnings are in indication that something is wrong with a web page you’re visiting.

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HTTPS, the lock icon in the address bar, an encrypted website connection — it’s known as many things. Knowing what it means is important, as it has serious implications banking online, shopping, and avoiding phishing.

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Have you ever noticed that it’s C:\Windows\ in Windows, http://howtogeek.com/ on the web, and /home/user/ on Linux, OS X, and Android? Windows uses backslashes for paths, while everything else seems to use forward slashes.

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You’re playing a game and you Alt+Tab to use another program, but there’s a problem. The Alt+Tab process may be extremely slow, the game may crash or freeze, or you may see graphical corruption.

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Windows has quite a few features for automatically arranging windows, placing them side by side or tiling them on your screen. These features are a bit hidden, so you may not have noticed them.

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There is a huge number of antivirus programs to choose from, so how do you find the best one? Do you use what came with your computer or what your friend recommended? How do you know if it’s any good?

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Did you know that you can drag and drop files and folders to the command prompt or terminal? It simply auto-completes the path, so you don’t have to type the full thing out or navigate to the right folder. This works in Windows or Mac, and maybe elsewhere.

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Once upon a time Windows natively displayed PSD thumbnails after you installed Photoshop. These days, however, you only get the generic Photoshop icon. How can you get the thumbnails for Photoshop back (and other image and design formats in the process)?

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You can easily access the PC Settings screen in Windows 8.1… by swiping on the right side of the screen, and then clicking on Settings, and then finally clicking on PC Settings at the bottom of the window. Since that’s a pain, here is how to pin it to your Start Screen.

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Microsoft Office saves hidden metadata in your Office documents, including how long you’ve been working on them, the name of everyone who’s worked on the document, when the document was created, and even previous versions of the document.

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While doing some cleaning up on a test computer around the office, we realized that we’ve never written about how to block an application from running using a registry hack. It’s easy, so here you go.

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Once a month, a new version of the Malicious Software Removal tool appears in Windows Update. This tool removes some malware from Windows systems, particularly those systems without antivirus programs installed.

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If you’ve recently made the jump to Windows 8 and you’re puzzled over the seemingly limited thumbnail size choices, read on as we highlight how to get extra large thumbnails back (and some very handy keyboard shortcuts that give you access to a whopping 45 thumbnail size choices).

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If you work with Windows long enough, especially with folders and files that have long names, you’ll run into a bizarre error: Windows will report that the folder path or file name is too long to move to a new destination or even delete. What’s the deal?

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You recommend a program to a family member, and they proceed to install it along with five other junkware programs that sneak their way on to their computer in the installation process.  Sound familiar?  Unchecky prevents these unnecessary programs from installing themselves by unchecking the appropriate boxes.

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