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It is no secret that the Home Editions of Windows systems have had certain features trimmed out or made inaccessible without an upgrade, so why would a person see features that are supposedly not included? Today’s SuperUser Q&A post has the answer to a confused reader’s question.

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If you’re out and about and there’s no free Wi-Fi available, you can use your iPhone’s internet connection on another device, like a laptop or tablet. This feature is called “Personal Hotspot” on the iPhone (also known as “tethering”), and you can use it over Wi-Fi or USB.

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OneNote 2016 is a great program for taking, storing, and syncing notes, but if you want to archive your notes or share them with someone who doesn’t have a Microsoft account, you can export them to other file formats. Here is a quick look at how it’s done.

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Do you wish you could browse a massive collection of retro games from your couch, without having to connect a bunch of systems or cobble together various emulators? RetroArch makes it possible. This all-in-one emulation station can run almost any retro game imaginable, and works on Windows, Mac, and Linux computers.

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Enable BitLocker encryption, and Windows will automatically unlock your drive each time you start your computer using the TPM built into most modern computers. But you can set up any USB flash drive as a “startup key” that must be present at boot before your computer can decrypt its drive and start Windows.

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With the arrival of Windows 10’s Bash shell, you can now create and run Bash shell scripts on Windows 10. You can also incorporate Bash commands into a Windows batch file or PowerShell script.

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You can reinstall Windows from scratch using the product key that came with your PC, but you’ll have to find installation media yourself. Microsoft offers free ISO files for downloading; you just have to know where to look.

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The Mail app in Windows 10 is surprisingly robust, supporting multiple accounts and multiple services like Outlook, Gmail, Exchange, and of course POP3 and IMAP. Assuming you’ve got multiple accounts set up, you can also create a live tile on your Start menu for each account. You can even create separate live tiles for folders you create in the app. Here’s how to do it.

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You can easily count paragraphs, as well as pages, words, characters, and lines, in a Word document. However, what if you want to know how many paragraphs of a specific style you have in your document? We’ll show you a trick that allows you to easily get this number.

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Solid Internet connections aren’t available everywhere. If you want to watch streaming movies and TV shows on an airplane, on the subway, or somewhere out in the wilderness away from cellular towers, you can download them ahead of time.

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Windows’ hibernation setting can be a very useful “feature” when you need to quickly start your computer, but there are times when you want or need to completely shut down your operating system every time instead of just occasionally. With that in mind, today’s SuperUser Q&A post has a quick and easy solution to a frustrated reader’s problem.

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Windows 8 and 10 both allow you to set certain types of connections as metered so that you can limit the amount of data Windows (and certain apps) can use without asking. You can use the regular Settings interface to set mobile and Wi-Fi connections as metered, but for some reason Windows assumes you won’t need to do this with wired Ethernet connections. If you use an ISP that has monthly data caps, you know better. The good news is that a quick Registry edit will fix you right up.

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Windows 10 includes an underlying “Windows Subsystem for Linux” to run Linux applications, but it’s only accessible via the Bash shell. However, there is a way to run Linux applications without first launching a Bash window.

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Sometimes you need to get stuff from your computer to your phone—pictures, files, links, text, etc. And most of the time, that’s way more of a pain than it should be. If you’re tired of uploading files to Dropbox or Drive, emailing links to yourself, or—worst of all—plugging your phone into your computer just to get your stuff from point A to B, stop. There’s an easier way. In fact, we’ve got three easier ways. Let’s get to it.

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Bookmarks are so last decade. If you find an article online that you want to save for later, stick it in Pocket–a free web service that saves articles and syncs them to all your devices, without ads or unnecessary formatting. You can even read them offline.

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We talk about a lot of cool things here at How-To Geek that you can do by editing the Windows Registry. Occasionally, though, you will run into a Registry key or value that you don’t have permission to edit. When you try, you’ll see an error message saying “Cannot edit _____: Error writing the value’s new contents.” Fortunately, just like in the Windows file system, the Registry provides tools that let you take ownership of and edit permissions for keys. Here’s how to do it.

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Comments in Excel are great for making notes about certain cells so you can keep track of your work. If you’ve added a lot of comments to your worksheets, it can get hard to remember where you put a specific note in a comment.

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By default, the Windows File Explorer’s sidebar is divided into big categories like Quick Access, This PC, Network, and so on. But a quick setting change can make your navigation pane look a bit more like the traditional tree you’d see in an Open/Save As dialog box, with a few normally hidden folders–like the Control Panel and Recycle Bin–to the view as a bonus.

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Install Windows 10’s Ubuntu-based Bash shell and you’ll have a complete Ubuntu environment that lets you install and run the same applications you could run on an Ubuntu-based Linux system. Just like on Ubuntu, though, you’ll need the apt-get command to install and update software.

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The pretty-darn-stable public beta release of iOS 10 is available now. If you want to take advantage of it, we’re here to show you how to update your iPhone, iPad, or other eligible iOS device and try it out.

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The Domain Name System (DNS) translates the human-friendly domain names you type in–like “howtogeek.com”–into numerical IP addresses. The trouble is, your internet provider may not have the fastest or most reliable DNS servers available. You can easily configure your Wi-Fi connections in iOS to use better DNS servers, like those run by Google or OpenDNS. Here’s how to get it done.

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Windows 10’s Bash shell doesn’t officially support graphical Linux desktop applications. Microsoft says this feature is designed only for developers who want to run Linux terminal utilities. But the underlying “Windows Subsystem for Linux” is more powerful than Microsoft lets on.

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I saw the “Family Hub” fridge at CES 2016, and was assured by a Samsung representative that it wasn’t a joke. It is a serious product you can now buy in stores, but it probably shouldn’t be.

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Setting a unique background on each of your multiple monitors was a simple trick in Windows 8, but the menu is buried to the point of being invisible in Windows 10. But it’s still there, if you know where to look.

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It may seem rudimentary, but if you’re new to Windows–or just upgrading from Windows 7–the simple option to sign out of your account is a bit hidden in Windows 8 and 10. And even we geeks can be baffled at times, especially when Microsoft decides to hide common features away in new places. You can still sign out of Windows from the Start menu; it’s just not part of the Power options any more.

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