OFFICE ARTICLES / MICROSOFT OFFICE, GOOGLE DOCS, AND MORE

If you’re sharing a document and you want to avoid changes being made to it, you can force Word to prompt the user to open the document as read only when they open the file. We’ll show you how to enable this setting.

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The Status Bar in Word is available at the bottom of the document window and displays information about your document, such as what page you are currently viewing, how many words are in your document, and whether any proofing errors were found.

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The Most Recently Used, or MRU, list in Office programs refers to the list of files you have recently opened. This list displays when you open an Office document without opening a document and on the “Open” screen, providing quick access to documents you open often.

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Word 2013 now includes a new proofing panel. When you have a document open that contains spelling or grammatical errors, the Proofing icon on the status bar displays the “Proofing errors were found. Click to correct.” message when you move your mouse over it.

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Word is a powerful application, but some of the configuration tools are not very intuitive. It’s easy enough to change the font for text in your current document, but that doesn’t change the default font that’s applied every time you create a new document.

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When you add a screenshot to a Microsoft Office document and crop it, you most likely give no further thought to the unused portions, but did you know that they are still there and could pose a security risk if they contain sensitive information? Today’s SuperUser Q&A helps a worried reader retain only those parts of the screenshots needed while permanently getting rid of the rest.

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Every new version of Word brings new features that are not available in the previous versions. In Word 2007, in addition to adding new features, Microsoft changed the file format for Word documents and the file extension changed from “.doc” to “.docx”.

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Have you recently upgraded to Word 2013? Documents created in earlier versions of Word are compatible with Word 2013, but the new features in Word 2013 will not be available in your older documents unless you convert them to the latest version.

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There may be times when you want to make changes to a document, but not take the chance that the changes become permanent. To avoid affecting the original document, you can create a clone of the document, and we’ll show how to easily do this.

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Each of us has a preferred layout and setup when we are working with Microsoft Word, but what if something you like and rely on has disappeared? Today’s SuperUser Q&A post helps a frustrated reader get their Microsoft Word layout back to just the way they like it.

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Word allows you to open multiple documents at once as well as view multiple documents at once. What if you make changes to all the open documents and then want to quickly save and close all of them? Easy to do and we’ll show you how.

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You’re working on a document and discover that you need to send part of it in an email to a colleague. Rather than manually creating a new email in Outlook before you can paste the text, you can simply paste it while in Outlook.

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If you’re working on multiple Word documents, it may be helpful to view some or all of them at once. There are a couple of different ways you can view multiple documents and even a way to view different parts of the same document at the same time.

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Word includes a tool that allows you to view simple statistics about your document. These statistics include how many pages, words, characters, paragraphs, and lines are in your document. This is useful if you have to follow certain guidelines when writing your document.

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We’ve shown you how to hide cells, rows, and columns and how to hide worksheets/tabs and entire workbooks in Excel. Additionally, you can hide items such as comments, formulas, overflow text, and gridlines. We’ll show you how to hide these items.

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If you use a worksheet in your Excel workbook to hold values or formulas referenced on other worksheets, you may not want that worksheet visible on the tab bar at the bottom of the Excel window. The good news is you can easily hide worksheets in Excel.

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If you’re short on screen space, you may want to hide parts of the Excel window, such as the ribbon and the worksheet tabs. We’ve already shown you how to hide the ribbon, so here we’ll show you how to hide the tabs.

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When you are busy working in Microsoft Excel, the last thing you need is to have to continuously fix or remove errors. With that in mind, today’s SuperUser Q&A post helps a reader quickly and easily remove pesky number sign errors from his Microsoft Excel sheets.

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There may be times when you want to hide information in certain cells or hide entire rows or columns in an Excel worksheet. Maybe you have some extra data you reference in other cells that does not need to be visible.

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If you work on several different documents at a time, Word makes it easy to open multiple documents in different windows at once. It’s as easy as selecting multiple files like you do in Windows Explorer.

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Microsoft offers two different versions of Office for Windows 10. Traditional desktop apps are available for keyboard-and-mouse, and universal apps are available for touch. But it’s not that simple.

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Opening a Word document as read-only helps prevent unintentional changes you make to the document from being saved. Read-Only mode does not allow you to make any changes to the document, preventing you from inadvertently saving changes. We will show you how to open any Word document as read-only.

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Word automatically formats items like quotes, bulleted and numbered lists, and horizontal lines. When you type at least three dashes, underscores, or equal signs in a paragraph by themselves and press “Enter”, the characters are automatically converted to a single, thick single, or double horizontal line, respectively.

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Paragraph and character styles in Word are part of the basic structure of every document you create in Word. When you use either the built-in styles, or custom styles you’ve created, you might want to use the keyboard to quickly apply the styles to your content.

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Word comes with some useful layouts for viewing your documents in different situations. These layouts include a print-friendly layout, a webpage layout, and a new layout as of Word 2013 called “Read Mode” that’s aimed at viewing documents on modern devices such as tablets.

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