OFFICE ARTICLES / MICROSOFT OFFICE, GOOGLE DOCS, AND MORE

By default, when you create a new table, all the cells have black borders that print with the document. However, there are also table gridlines that make it easier to see where each cell is located in a table if you turned off the cell borders.

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If you’ve applied various formatting changes to the content in your document, and they either don’t work or you want to start over, you can easily clear formatting from selected text. We’ll show you a couple of ways to do this.

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By default, the slash (/) key displays the shortcuts to the commands on the ribbon in Excel. So, what do you do if you want to enter a slash in a cell? There’s a way to disable this setting so you can type a slash in cells.

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Most of us receive a lot of email and important messages may get overlooked in our long list of messages. If you’re sending a message that requires attention in a timely manner, you can set the priority for the message, allowing the recipient to find it quickly.

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Finding out how many pages are in a Word document is really easy when the document is open. However, what if you have a lot of documents in one folder for which you want to find out page counts? This is easily done in Windows.

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When saving a file for the first time, you may have noticed Word suggesting a file name to you in the “Save As” dialog box. This file name is typically taken from the first paragraph in your document. However, this is actually Word’s second choice for suggested file names.

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Word provides default font formatting and paragraph formatting that is applied to content entered into new documents. However, you can change the paragraph formatting in the default Normal template for new documents as well as in existing documents. We’ll show how to do both.

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There may be times when you need to copy or move a worksheet into another workbook in Excel or make a copy of a worksheet in the same workbook. Maybe you want to make changes but preserve the original worksheet.

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We’ve shown you how to set the advanced document properties, or summary information, that are stored in your Word documents, along with the properties automatically maintained for each document. Printing this information, if you should need to, is quite easy to do.

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Gridlines and the row and column headings can be helpful when viewing data on worksheets printed in Excel. We’ll show you how to turn on a couple of settings to show the gridlines and row and column headings on your printed worksheets.

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You may not have thought about the color of the gridlines in Excel before, but if you’re bored with the default gray color or you want to use a color that’s easier on your eyes, you can change the color of the gridlines.

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Next to entering text, graphics, and other content in Word, selecting content is probably the most common task you’ll perform. Just about every task begins by selecting something, whether it be text, an image, a table, etc. We’ll show you several methods for selecting content in Word.

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If you’re sharing a document and you want to avoid changes being made to it, you can force Word to prompt the user to open the document as read only when they open the file. We’ll show you how to enable this setting.

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The Status Bar in Word is available at the bottom of the document window and displays information about your document, such as what page you are currently viewing, how many words are in your document, and whether any proofing errors were found.

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The Most Recently Used, or MRU, list in Office programs refers to the list of files you have recently opened. This list displays when you open an Office document without opening a document and on the “Open” screen, providing quick access to documents you open often.

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Word 2013 now includes a new proofing panel. When you have a document open that contains spelling or grammatical errors, the Proofing icon on the status bar displays the “Proofing errors were found. Click to correct.” message when you move your mouse over it.

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Word is a powerful application, but some of the configuration tools are not very intuitive. It’s easy enough to change the font for text in your current document, but that doesn’t change the default font that’s applied every time you create a new document.

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When you add a screenshot to a Microsoft Office document and crop it, you most likely give no further thought to the unused portions, but did you know that they are still there and could pose a security risk if they contain sensitive information? Today’s SuperUser Q&A helps a worried reader retain only those parts of the screenshots needed while permanently getting rid of the rest.

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Every new version of Word brings new features that are not available in the previous versions. In Word 2007, in addition to adding new features, Microsoft changed the file format for Word documents and the file extension changed from “.doc” to “.docx”.

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Have you recently upgraded to Word 2013? Documents created in earlier versions of Word are compatible with Word 2013, but the new features in Word 2013 will not be available in your older documents unless you convert them to the latest version.

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There may be times when you want to make changes to a document, but not take the chance that the changes become permanent. To avoid affecting the original document, you can create a clone of the document, and we’ll show how to easily do this.

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Each of us has a preferred layout and setup when we are working with Microsoft Word, but what if something you like and rely on has disappeared? Today’s SuperUser Q&A post helps a frustrated reader get their Microsoft Word layout back to just the way they like it.

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Word allows you to open multiple documents at once as well as view multiple documents at once. What if you make changes to all the open documents and then want to quickly save and close all of them? Easy to do and we’ll show you how.

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You’re working on a document and discover that you need to send part of it in an email to a colleague. Rather than manually creating a new email in Outlook before you can paste the text, you can simply paste it while in Outlook.

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If you’re working on multiple Word documents, it may be helpful to view some or all of them at once. There are a couple of different ways you can view multiple documents and even a way to view different parts of the same document at the same time.

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