OFFICE ARTICLES / MICROSOFT OFFICE, GOOGLE DOCS, AND MORE

Word has a handy feature that automatically formats what you type, as you type it. This includes changing quotes to Smart Quotes, automatically creating bulleted and numbered lists, and creating hyperlinks from web addresses. However, what if you have an existing document you want to automatically format?

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Word allows you to highlight text just as you would using a highlighter on paper. You can call out specific parts of a document using the highlighting tool. What if you want to copy all non-contiguous highlighted text into a different document?

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As you type in some word processors, quotes marks may automatically get converted from straight quotes to “smart quotes,” which are typographically correct quote marks that are curved one way at the beginning of a quote and the other way at the end of a quote.

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By default, Word doesn’t allow you to quickly select sentences using the keyboard. However, you can add keyboard shortcuts for some “hidden” commands available in Word that allow you to select entire sentences and jump through a document a sentence at a time.

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Word has two different modes used for editing text – Insert mode and Overtype mode. Insert mode is the default and more commonly used mode. In Insert mode, text you type is inserted at the insertion point.

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You’ll need a unique product key to reinstall Windows on your PC. This is more confusing than it sounds — you may not be able to re-use the key your computer’s manufacturer used.

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Sometimes you may need to jump to a specific location relative to your current location in a Word document. You can easily do this using the “Go To” function to jump forward or back a specified number of pages.

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By default, in Word, when you select text and then type anything, the selected text is replaced with what you type. This can be frustrating if you’ve highlighted some text and then accidentally pressed a key and lost your work.

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When working in Microsoft Office, you may have files you open often or a specific folder you use to store all your Office documents. Office programs allow you to pin most-used files and folders to the “Open” screen for quick and easy access.

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Outlook 2013 lets you assign categories to stuff and customize said categories. The thing about categories is that they’re universal across Outlook, and can you assign each category to a keyboard combination. So, you can categorize email, calendar events, and notes with a couple quick key strokes.

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If you are a keyboard ninja, then you hate having to move your hands from the keyboard for any reason unless there is no other option. Today’s SuperUser Q&A post provides multiple ways to help a frustrated reader keep his hands on the keyboard while using Microsoft Excel.

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If you have a lot of blank rows in your Excel spreadsheet, you can delete them by right-clicking each once separately and selecting “Delete,” a very time-consuming task. However, there’s a quicker and easier way of deleting both blank rows and blank columns.

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Today, we’re covering the “boring” Outlook stuff. Maintenance and security, as in, maintaining and securing your Outlook 2013 data file – full of all your important data – by backing up and archiving it.

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Notes are simple and very handy. They are basically desktop Post Its, which you can collect and save in your Outlook and display on your desktop as reminders to do stuff.

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If you’re planning on doing a reinstall of Windows but can’t find your product key, you’re in luck because it’s stored in the Windows Registry. It’s just not easy to find, and it’s impossible to read without some help. Luckily, we’re here to help.

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If you’re one of those people who has a whiteboard or notepad with an ever-evolving to-do list, or your desk and monitors are adorned with Post-its® reminding you of important events, then this the article for you.

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Unless you’re living a life free of responsibilities, the sun probably rises and settles on your daily calendar. If you don’t know what’s going on a daily basis, you can quickly find yourself lost in a maze of missed appointments and surprise meetings.

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If you tell us email has fallen out of fashion, we’d ask you to have a look at our inboxes. Being able to sort through and organize the mess of messages that arrive daily is fairly key to maintaining workplace sanity.

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There comes a time, job-hunting, or sharing photos with older family members, where you may need to send stuff the old fashioned way – as an email attachment. If you email at work, it may be a part of your email repertoire.

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Outlook is fairly synonymous with email. Therefore, beyond all its other features, you want to make sure you know how to use it with e-mail as effectively as possible.

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If you are an Outlook.com user, you may be interested to know that setting up rules to manage your incoming and outgoing emails can make your life a whole lot simpler.

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Outlook isn’t much use if you don’t have contacts. Sure, you can enter email addresses as you go, but that’s time-consuming and error-prone. It’s better to have your contacts already in Outlook, so you can dash off a quick message in just a few clicks.

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Many of us crave organization and productivity. If you already use Microsoft Office, then you already have the ultimate tool to sate that craving: Outlook 2013.

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When you are creating surveys or  forms, with Microsoft Word, it is usually a good idea to add check boxes to make the options easy to read and answer. There are two main methods which you can use. The first method is ideal for documents that you want people to fill out digitally, while the second option is great for printed documents like to-do lists.

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Creating forms with Microsoft Word is easy, but the challenge comes in when you decide to create fillable forms with options that you can send to people and have them fill out digitally. Whether you need a form for gathering information about people or if you are trying to take a survey to test out user response to software or a new product, MS Word has the solution for you.

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