LINUX IS CONFUSING. THESE ARTICLES SHOULD HELP.

APT, the Advanced Package Tool from the Debian project, is for managing packages by using a lot of separate tools to accomplish various tasks. In the past, users needed to know multiple command structures like apt-get, apt-cache, apt-config, and many more to utilize the full feature-set of APT.

about 10 months ago - by  |  10 Replies

Google doesn’t provide an easy way to see the storage, RAM, CPU, and other specifications of your Chromebook. But it’s possible to dig all this information up, just as you could on a traditional computer operating system.

about 10 months ago - by  |  1 Reply

Valve’s Steam Controller isn’t just designed for new games. Unlike other controllers, it’s designed to be backwards-compatible with as many games as possible — even ones designed for keyboard and mouse controls. To make the controller work with a game, you may need to tweak is controller profile.

about 10 months ago - by  |  2 Replies

Your router’s web-based setup page allows you to change various settings — like your Wi-Fi network’s name and password — and view information. You’ll need your router’s IP address to access it.

about 10 months ago - by  |  15 Replies

Modern versions of Google Chrome and Mozilla Firefox prevent you from installing unapproved add-ons. This is a good thing, and helps block malware from your browser. But you may sometimes need to install an unapproved add-on from a CRX or XPI file.

about 10 months ago - by  |  2 Replies

Broadband is the lifeblood of the modern household and it’s incredibly frustrating when your Internet connection is flaky. Read on as we walk you through our tried and true troubleshooting techniques so you can pin down exactly where your connectivity problems are coming from.

about 11 months ago - by  |  4 Replies

On a Chromebook, only apps from the Chrome Web Store typically get their own taskbar icons and separate windows. But you can give any website its own taskbar icon and make it open in a separate window, effectively turning any website you like into an “app.”

about 11 months ago - by  |  4 Replies

U2F is an emerging standard for physical authentication tokens. Current U2F keys are all small USB devices. To log in, you won’t need to enter an authentication code provided from an app or SMS — just insert the USB security key and press a button. Here’s how they work.

about 11 months ago - by  |  11 Replies

U2F is a new standard for universal two-factor authentication tokens. These tokens can use USB, NFC, or Bluetooth to provide two-factor authentication across a variety of services. It’s already supported in Chrome for Google, Dropbox, and GitHub accounts. Microsoft is working on implementing it in Edge.

about 11 months ago - by  |  22 Replies

Web pages can automatically play audio thanks to HTML5, even if you’ve set Flash and other browser plug-ins to click-to-play. Most modern web browsers include an audio indicator that will show you which tab is playing sound. Most modern browsers also let you mute individual tabs.

about 11 months ago - by  |  3 Replies

Four months into its release, Windows 10 is doing alright, and despite some hiccups, we think it’s about time to upgrade. Here then are ten reasons you might consider making the leap, if you haven’t already.

about 11 months ago - by  |  107 Replies

Did you know Google has its own dedicated password manager? It’s more than just password-syncing built into the Chrome browser — Google’s solution also offers a web app, mobile apps, deep integration with Android, and automatic generation of strong passwords.

about 11 months ago - by  |  23 Replies

While all operating systems have some things in common, you may find yourself wondering if one type of operating system has a specific ‘feature’ that another one does. With that in mind, today’s SuperUser Q&A post has the answers to a curious reader’s question.

about 11 months ago - by  |  1 Reply

The Cloud is ubiquitous, and with it, a myriad of service and products, many of which the average user doesn’t even comprehend. Cloud storage, however, is definitely something that nearly everyone uses, so which one do we think is best for you?

about 11 months ago - by  |  13 Replies

Mac OS X 10.11 El Capitan protects system files and processes with a new feature named System Integrity Protection. SIP is a kernel-level feature that limits what the “root” account can do.

about 11 months ago - by  |  1 Reply

Disc images have become more useful than ever on modern PCs that often lack CD and DVD drives. Create ISO files and other types of disc images and you can “mount” them, accessing the virtual discs as if they were physical discs inserted into your computer.

about 11 months ago - by  |  5 Replies

Install Windows 3.1 in DOSBox to run old 16-bit Windows games on 64-bit versions of Windows, Mac OS X, Linux, and anywhere else DOSBox runs. This is particularly useful as only 32-bit versions of Windows can run those 16-bit applications.

about 12 months ago - by  |  6 Replies

New versions of Windows don’t fully support classic DOS games and other old applications — this is where DOSBox comes in. It provides a full DOS environment that runs ancient DOS apps on modern operating systems.

about 12 months ago - by  |  4 Replies

To use the Linux terminal like a pro, you’ll need to know the basics of managing files and navigating directories. True to the Unix philosophy, each command does one thing and does it well.

about 12 months ago - by  |  2 Replies

SSH is a lifesaver when you need to remotely manage a computer, but did you know you can also upload and download files, too? Using SSH keys, you can skip having to enter passwords and use this for scripts!

about 12 months ago - by  |  6 Replies

ImageMagick is a suite of command-line utilities for modifying and working with images. ImageMagick can quickly perform operations on an image from a terminal, perform batch processing of many images, or be integrated into a bash script.

about 12 months ago - by  |  1 Reply

New to the Linux command-line? Confused by all of the other advanced text editors? How-To Geek’s got your back with this tutorial to Nano, a simple text-editor that’s very newbie-friendly.

about 12 months ago - by  |  2 Replies

The term “shell scripting” gets mentioned often in Linux forums, but many users aren’t familiar with it. Learning this easy and powerful programming method can help you save time, learn the command-line better, and banish tedious file management tasks.

about 12 months ago - by  |  3 Replies

Linux provides different methods for installing software. You can install software from the standard Ubuntu software repositories using the Ubuntu Software Center, from outside of the standard Ubuntu software repositories, or by compiling source code. However, what if you need to uninstall a program?

about 12 months ago - by  |  1 Reply

The Ubuntu Software Center allows you to easily add and remove programs in Ubuntu. However, each Linux distribution has a different graphical method for adding and removing software. If you prefer using the keyboard, you can install and uninstall software using the command line.

about 12 months ago - by  |  2 Replies