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LINUX IS CONFUSING. THESE ARTICLES SHOULD HELP.

If you use Windows, you are probably familiar with the Add/Remove Programs tool in the Windows control panel. It lists the programs currently installed on your system and provides an easy method for uninstalling them with only a few clicks.

about 11 months ago - by  |  4 Replies

Ubuntu asks you to choose a name for your computer — known as a “hostname” — when you install it. You can change this hostname later, but Ubuntu doesn’t provide a graphical interface for doing so.

about 11 months ago - by  |  3 Replies

Choosing the best Wi-Fi channel on your router helps to reduce interference and improve your WI-Fi signal. These tools will help you identify the least congested Wi-Fi channel in your area.

about 11 months ago - by  |  11 Replies

You’ve protected a PDF file containing sensitive information with a long, secure password so only the intended party can open it. However, you don’t want to enter that password every time you access the document, so you want to remove the password from your copy.

about 11 months ago - by  |  1 Reply

Linux’s GRUB2 boot loader can boot Linux ISO files directly from your hard drive. Boot Linux live CDs or even install Linux on another hard drive partition without burning it to disc or booting from a USB drive.

about 11 months ago - by  |  8 Replies

Ubuntu doesn’t offer the Safe Mode and Automatic Repair tools you’ll find in Windows, but it does offer a recovery menu and a reinstall option that keeps your files and programs.

about 11 months ago - by  |  3 Replies

Ubuntu and most other Linux distributions now use the GRUB2 boot loader. You can change its settings to select a default operating system, set a background image, and choose how long GRUB counts down before automatically booting the default OS.

about 11 months ago - by  |  6 Replies

Google introduced Google Drive on April 24, 2012 and promised Linux support “coming soon.” That was nearly two and a half years ago. There’s now a somewhat “official” Google Drive client for Linux, but it’s probably not what you want.

about 12 months ago - by  |  23 Replies

Ubuntu and practically every other Linux distribution use the GRUB2 boot loader. Unless you have multiple operating systems installed, this bootloader is normally hidden — but it provides options you may sometimes need.

about 12 months ago - by  |  2 Replies

Enclosing text in quotation marks is fairly standard practice on the command line, especially when dealing with files that have spaces in the names, but how do you know whether to use single or double quotes? Let’s take a look at the difference, and when you should use one vs the other.

about 12 months ago - by  |  2 Replies

According to an old rule of thumb, your page file or swap should be “double your RAM” or “1.5x your RAM.” But do you really need a 32 GB page file or swap if you have 16 GB of RAM?

about 12 months ago - by  |  19 Replies

Virtual machines allow you to run an operating system in a window on your desktop. Use them to run software made for other operating systems, experiment with different operating systems, and sandbox software.

about 12 months ago - by  |  17 Replies

Ubuntu 14.10 has just taken its next step toward a final release this week with the availability of the first round of betas. There are six regular UI flavors and an alternative Kubuntu desktop UI version available for download, so grab a stack of blank DVDS and get ready for a weekend of testing fun!

about 1 year ago - by  |  1 Reply

Tab completion is an extremely helpful feature in nearly any command-line environment, whether you’re using the Bash shell on Linux, Command Prompt or PowerShell on Windows, or a terminal window on Mac OS X.

about 1 year ago - by  |  1 Reply

Windows, Linux, and other operating systems all have built-in support for IPv6, and it’s enabled by default. According to a myth going around, this IPv6 support is slowing down your connection and disabling it will speed things up.

about 1 year ago - by  |  5 Replies

You can hide files on any operating system, but hidden files can be accessed by anyone with access to your PC or its storage. Encryption actually protects your files, preventing people from accessing them without your encryption key.

about 1 year ago - by  |  23 Replies

In 2005, Linus Torvalds said, “I don’t use GNOME, because in striving to be simple, it has long since reached the point where it simply doesn’t do what I need it to do.” GNOME’s developers have continued removing options.

about 1 year ago - by  |  3 Replies

For most people, Caps Lock is only an obstacle to avoid while typing. Having Caps Lock do nothing at all would be an improvement. You don’t have to pry Caps Lock off your keyboard — you can disable it.

about 1 year ago - by  |  10 Replies

A hidden file or folder is just a normal file or folder with a “hidden” option set. Operating systems hide these files by default, so you can use this trick to hide some files if you share a computer with someone else.

about 1 year ago - by  |  6 Replies

Linux, Mac, and other Unix-like systems display “load average” numbers. These numbers tell you how busy your system’s CPU, disk, and other resources are. They’re not self-explanatory at first, but it’s easy to become familiar with them.

about 1 year ago - by  |  5 Replies

Computers don’t come with operating system installation CDs anymore. If your operating system won’t boot, you’ll need a bootable recovery drive to fix it. All operating systems allow you to create these.

about 1 year ago - by  |  6 Replies

The big cloud storage services — Dropbox, Google Drive, Microsoft OneDrive, and others — all have the same problem. They can only synchronize folders inside your cloud storage folder. But there’s a way around this limitation: symbolic links.

about 1 year ago - by  |  5 Replies

Linux applications store their settings in hidden folders inside each user account’s home folder. This makes application settings much easier to back up and restore than they are on Windows, where settings are scattered across the registry and system folders.

about 1 year ago - by  |  1 Reply

Ubuntu provides four different software repositories, all of them official — Main, Restricted, Universe, and Multiverse. Main and Restricted are fully supported by Canonical, while Universe and Multiverse don’t receive the support you might expect.

about 1 year ago - by  |  1 Reply

Your Windows system’s uptime is displayed in the Task Manager. Right-click the taskbar and select Task Manager or press Ctrl+Shift+Escape to open it.

about 1 year ago - by  |  20 Replies