LINUX IS CONFUSING. THESE ARTICLES SHOULD HELP.

Press the “up” arrow in the Mac or Linux command line and you’ll see the last command you ran. Keep pressing “up” and you’ll see more commands; you can go back days, months, or even years.

about 2 months ago - by  |  2 Replies

You closed the only Safari window that’s open, but on the dock you see the browser is still running. Are you going nuts?

about 2 months ago - by  |  1 Reply

Modern PCs ship with a feature called “Secure Boot” enabled. This is a platform feature in UEFI, which replaces the traditional PC BIOS. If a PC manufacturer wants to place a “Windows 10” or “Windows 8” logo sticker to their PC, Microsoft requires they enable Secure Boot and follow some guidelines.

about 2 months ago - by  |  1 Reply

The cat command is very useful in Linux. It has three main functions related to manipulating text files: creating them, displaying them, and combining them.

about 2 months ago - by  |  1 Reply

USB drives should automatically appear in Windows Explorer when you connect them to your computer. Follow these troubleshooting steps if Windows doesn’t show a connected drive.

about 2 months ago - by  |  5 Replies

Chromebooks aren’t “just a browser”—they’re Linux laptops. You can easily install a full Linux desktop alongside alongside Chrome OS and instantly switch between the two with a hotkey, no rebooting necessary.

about 2 months ago - by  |  28 Replies

Starting with the Windows 10 Creators Update, which comes out this spring, anyone who installs the Bash environment will get Ubuntu 16.04 (Xenial). But, if you’ve previously installed Bash in the Anniversary Update, you’ll be stuck with Ubuntu 14.04 (Trusty) until you manually upgrade.

about 3 months ago - by  |  6 Replies

Most of the time, none of us willingly performs an action that will literally break our operating systems and force us to reinstall them. But what if such an action could easily occur even by accident on the user’s part? Today’s SuperUser Q&A post has the answer to a confused reader’s question.

about 3 months ago - by  |  1 Reply

Apple claims their live streams are only available in Safari on macOS and iOS. But you don’t have to miss the new iPhone launch if you’re using a Windows PC or Android device. Apple doesn’t make it obvious how to do this, but you can watch its live events on any operating system.

about 3 months ago - by  |  10 Replies

Sometimes, you don’t need to open an image in a photo editor–you just want to make sure which file is which. Instead of opening each file, you can preview each one in Ubuntu’s file manager program, Nautilus, without opening them.

about 3 months ago - by  |  1 Reply

Address Space Layout Randomization (ASLR) is a security technique used in operating systems, first implemented in 2001. The current versions of all major operating systems (iOS, Android, Windows, macOS, and Linux) feature ASLR protection. But in the past week, a new method of bypassing ASLR has been found. So, should you be worried?

about 3 months ago - by  |  1 Reply

Now over four years old, the Raspberry Pi, a cheap credit-card sized computer, has taken the computing and DIY world by storm. Read on as we guide you through everything from buying to powering to running the tiny dynamo.

about 3 months ago - by  |  8 Replies

Let’s be honest: Modern web browsers are all pretty solid. Even Microsoft Edge is much better than older versions of Internet Explorer. But we believe Google Chrome is still the best web browser for most people.

about 3 months ago - by  |  26 Replies

Ever wish you could send YouTube and other web videos from your phone or laptop to your TV? It’s a trick you’ve probably seen Chromecast and Apple TV users pull, but don’t feel left out: you can get it working in Kodi too.

about 3 months ago - by  |  3 Replies

If you want to remove several subdirectories within another directory using the command line in Linux, generally you have to use the rm command several times. However, there is a faster way to do this.

about 3 months ago - by  |  1 Reply

When you are creating a new shell script, you want to make sure it is as problem free as possible, but sometimes it can be a bit confusing to know which shebang is the best one for you to use. On that note, today’s SuperUser Q&A post has the answer to a confused reader’s question.

about 3 months ago - by  |  1 Reply

Remember when uTorrent was great? The upstart BitTorrent client was super lightweight and trounced other popular BitTorrent clients. But that was long ago, before BitTorrent, Inc. bought uTorrent and crammed it full of crapware and scammy advertisements.

about 3 months ago - by  |  29 Replies

If you want to create a directory containing several subdirectories, or a directory tree, using the command line in Linux, generally you have to use the mkdir command several times. However, there is a faster way to do this.

about 3 months ago - by  |  6 Replies

Website addresses that end in “.onion” aren’t like normal domain names, and you can’t access them with a normal web browser. Addresses that end with “.onion” point to Tor hidden services on the “deep web”.

about 3 months ago - by  |  2 Replies

By default, the Terminal window in Linux opens to your home directory. To change to any directory that is not directly in the home directory, you must provide the full path or use the “cd” command multiple times.

about 3 months ago - by  |  2 Replies

Homebrew makes it easy for Mac users to install command line tools, so it’s only logical that it runs entirely from the command line. But that doesn’t mean having access to a graphical user interface isn’t handy from time to time. Cakebrew is a free Homebirew GUI that makes overseeing your setup just a bit easier.

about 3 months ago - by  |  3 Replies

If you’ve accidentally turned on Caps Lock too many times–we’ve all been there–here is a solution. You can add an indicator to the top panel that shows the status of the Caps Lock, Num Lock, and Scroll Lock keys, that notifys you when one of them is pressed.

about 3 months ago - by  |  3 Replies

Since Windows 10’s release and the privacy controversy that followed, many “anti-spying” apps have sprung up. They promise to keep Windows 10 from tracking you–but often, they can cause more problems than they solve.

about 4 months ago - by  |  21 Replies

If you spend any time in the Terminal at all, you probably use the mkdir command to create a directory, and then the cd command to change to that directory right after. However, there is a way to do both of those actions with one command.

about 4 months ago - by  |  3 Replies

Official support for the ZFS file system is one of Ubuntu 16.04’s big features. It’s not installed and enabled by default, but it’s officially supported and offered in Ubuntu’s software repositories.

about 4 months ago - by  |  2 Replies