LINUX IS CONFUSING. THESE ARTICLES SHOULD HELP.

Website addresses that end in “.onion” aren’t like normal domain names, and you can’t access them with a normal web browser. Addresses that end with “.onion” point to Tor hidden services on the “deep web”.

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By default, the Terminal window in Linux opens to your home directory. To change to any directory that is not directly in the home directory, you must provide the full path or use the “cd” command multiple times.

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Homebrew makes it easy for Mac users to install command line tools, so it’s only logical that it runs entirely from the command line. But that doesn’t mean having access to a graphical user interface isn’t handy from time to time. Cakebrew is a free Homebirew GUI that makes overseeing your setup just a bit easier.

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If you’ve accidentally turned on Caps Lock too many times–we’ve all been there–here is a solution. You can add an indicator to the top panel that shows the status of the Caps Lock, Num Lock, and Scroll Lock keys, that notifys you when one of them is pressed.

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Since Windows 10’s release and the privacy controversy that followed, many “anti-spying” apps have sprung up. They promise to keep Windows 10 from tracking you–but often, they can cause more problems than they solve.

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If you spend any time in the Terminal at all, you probably use the mkdir command to create a directory, and then the cd command to change to that directory right after. However, there is a way to do both of those actions with one command.

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Official support for the ZFS file system is one of Ubuntu 16.04’s big features. It’s not installed and enabled by default, but it’s officially supported and offered in Ubuntu’s software repositories.

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If you’re working with files in the Terminal and switching back and forth between two directories, we’re about to save you some time. There is a shortcut command that allows you to toggle between two directories on the command line.

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Sometimes it is fun to dig a bit deeper into how things work just to satisfy your curiosity while learning something new, like PermitRootLogin, for example. Does it check the UID or the user name? Today’s SuperUser Q&A post digs in to find the answer to a curious reader’s question.

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By default, new Terminal windows open to your Home directory. However, if there’s another directory you use often that you want immediate access to when you open the Terminal, there’s an easy way to set this up.

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If other people use your Linux PC from time to time, you can hide files and folders from prying eyes. But if they know the obvious way to view hidden files, you can use a more secretive method: compress those files and hide them in an innocent looking image file.

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If you access multiple servers throughout the work day, then being able to tell which one you are working with at a glance based on a color scheme can be very useful. Today’s SuperUser Q&A post helps a reader achieve a colorful nirvana in his work environment.

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Windows 10 is controversial partly because it “phones home” so much. That’s true, but so does every other operating system–and practically every single program you use. Saying a program “phones home” doesn’t have meaning anymore. It’s why a program phones home that’s important.

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When you are in the process of learning how to fully use the Linux shell, you may find yourself curious about how much you can manipulate strings in order to get the best results. With that in mind, today’s SuperUser Q&A post has the answer to a curious reader’s question.

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If you use Linux, you know how useful the command line can be for working with files, installing software, and launching programs. But it can be even more efficient if you run multiple commands at once.

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VLC’s developers have been working on Chromecast support for some time, and it’s finally here. In the latest bleeding edge Windows versions of VLC, you can stream video and audio files from VLC media player on your PC to your Chromecast.

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Linux is a powerful and diverse operating system, so naturally the screenshot tools for the platform are just as powerful and diverse. The wide variety of these screeenshot tools range from simple and easy-to-use to powerful command-line tools that offer the ability to script and automate the process.

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So you’ve upgraded the hard drive in your computer, and you’re left with this old, seemingly useless bare hard drive. Don’t throw it away! It takes surprisingly little effort to turn an old (or new) hard drive into an external drive perfect for stashing your extra files on. Let’s look at how you can blow the dust off those old drives and save money in the process.

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Both Steam In-Home Streaming and NVIDIA GameStream allow you to stream games from a powerful gaming PC and play them on another device, bringing the power of your gaming PC to your living room or a slower laptop or tablet. But what’s the difference between them?

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PowerShell is now open source, and available for Linux and Mac. You can download official packages from Microsoft for the 64-bit versions of Ubuntu 16.04, Ubuntu 14.04, CentOS 7, Red Hat Enterprise Linux 7, and Mac OS X 10.11.

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We’re used to word processing programs telling us when we’ve misspelled a word, but what about when your fingers are flying through directories on the Linux command line? You can actually have your typos and misspellings automatically corrected, at least when using the cd command.

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If you work a lot in the command line, you probably keep more than one Terminal window open at once. However, instead of having separate windows, you can condense all your Terminal sessions onto one window using tabs.

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The command line in Linux is case sensitive. When you use tab completion to quickly change or list directories on the command line, you must match the case of the directory names. However, there is a way to make tab completion case insensitive.

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Windows 10’s Anniversary Update brings a “Bash on Ubuntu on Windows” environment to Windows 10. But don’t be deceived: This is more than just a Bash shell. It’s a full compatibility layer for running Linux applications on Windows.

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Google has done an excellent job of baking its own cloud service, Google Drive, into the Chrome OS file manager. If you use Drive for most of your cloud needs, then it feels like native storage on a a Chrome OS device. But if you use something else, like Dropbox or network attached storage, things don’t seem so clean. Here’s how to add those directly to the file manager in Chrome OS so you can navigate them quickly and easily.

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