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LINUX IS CONFUSING. THESE ARTICLES SHOULD HELP.

W3M is a terminal web browser for Linux. It’s got a few tricks up its sleeve, including support for images, tabs, tables, frames and other features not usually included with terminal web browsers.

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If you like to use multiple operating systems but don’t have extra computers to spare, we at How-To Geek have can help you set up your computer or tablet to run more than one operating system.

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Ubuntu’s Grub boot loader lets anyone edit boot entries or use its command-line mode by default. Secure Grub with a password and no one can edit them — you can even require a password before booting operating systems.

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Ubuntu’s Unity desktop environment has customizable keyboard shortcuts and animations, but its options are all hidden. We’ll show you how to get started with the CompizConfig Settings Manager and point out some of Unity’s more interesting configuration options.

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The cron daemon on Linux runs tasks in the background at specific times; it’s like the Task Scheduler on Windows. Add tasks to your system’s crontab files using the appropriate syntax and cron will automatically run them for you.

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Before we start there is a couple of things that you are going to need:

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Do you have an OS installed on your USB thumb drive? Booting from it in a VM is now possible, you’ll just have to use a simple trick to get it to work.

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We have discussed installing Ubuntu on a USB thumb before. This time, we’re doing it differently, to make it cleaner and easier to store your files.

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Windows XP just isn’t secure anymore! If the expense of the new Windows operating systems is too great, here’s an easy and painless way to get a completely free Linux, keep your old Windows XP installation, and start surfing securely.

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This week we learned how to encrypt and hide your personal files inside of a photo, “display image size in Google Images, preserve tabs while using CCleaner, & what to backup on your Windows box”, look up Event IDs from the Event Viewer using a free tool, turn your friends into zombies for Halloween (in Photoshop), found out what your favorite Windows Explorer alternatives are, and more.

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Are you less than pleased with Unity but want to keep using Ubuntu without switching to KDE, XFCE, or LXDE? Then you may want to take a closer look at the GNOME Shell Remix of Ubuntu 11.10.

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This week we learned how to get the Windows 8 Explorer ribbon in Windows 7, make ghosts in Photoshop or GIMP, remotely use a PC’s DVD drive across your network, install or enable Hyper-V Virtualization in Windows 8, enjoyed the latest set of Geek Deals, and more.

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Windows/Mac/Linux/iOS: Popular screen-dimming software f.lux is now available for jailbroken iOS devices. Install f.lux to enjoy gently adjusted brightness based on the time of day for easy-on-the-eyes computer use.

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Have you installed Ubuntu 11.04 as a virtual machine in VirtualBox but have had problems getting the Shared Folders feature to work? We were able to add a shared folder, but were unable to access it.

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Want to learn some new tricks for using the Ubuntu Software Center or know someone who is new to Ubuntu? Then grab a copy of this free 49 page guide and get ready to enjoy (or share) the goodness.

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This trick is for Linux and SSH users who often log in to remote systems. Having to type the same info over and over again is mind-numbingly repetitive, but using an SSH config file makes the process much more convenient.

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Every file on your computer has a timestamp, which contains the access and modification time for a file, but did you know that you can change that timestamp? Here’s how to do it.

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We’ve extolled the virtues of SSH numerous times, for both security and remote access. Let’s take a look at the server itself, some important “maintenance” aspects, and some quirks that can add turbulence to an otherwise smooth ride.

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Using the command line seems rugged and unpleasant, but Linux has a way to ease things up and help you get things done with the command line by allowing you to use aliases to customize how you type commands.

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When you’re using Linux, a popular way to share files with Windows is via Samba. For beginners, it can be a real pain to configure it manually, but with the right tool, it’s as easy as pie.

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When it comes to home servers, Linux is king. It’s free, it’s efficient, and the possibilities are endless! Join us as we go through the many ways to keep your open-source server streaming and serving up stuff for you.

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If you have missing GPG keys you’ll get an error like the one above in the screenshot if you are using Synaptic Package Manager and a similar one if you use the terminal. “Launchpad-getkeys” is a script that imports these missing keys automatically.

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Windows/Mac/Linux: If you take your wallpaper acquisition and rotation needs seriously, Wally is a powerhouse of a wallpaper management tool. Download wallpapers automatically, rotate them, and more.

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Whether you want to listen to music on your smartphone or watch movies on your iPad, you may need to convert you media files from one format to another depending on what your devices support.

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Usually making Ubuntu mount a partition at startup would require fiddling with the “fstab” which is confusing. The easiest way to mount your partitions automatically when you turn on your computer is by reading this article. So let’s get started!

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