LINUX IS CONFUSING. THESE ARTICLES SHOULD HELP.

If you are new to using Linux, then many of the commands and variations thereof may seem a bit confusing. Take the “echo” command, for example. Why do people use it when installing software? Today’s SuperUser Q&A post has the answer to a new Linux user’s question.

about 6 days ago - by  |  2 Replies

The Windows 10 Creators Update–also known as Redstone 2–is due to hit PCs in April, 2017. Like other updates to Windows 10, it’s free, and includes a host of new features.

about 6 days ago - by  |  36 Replies

Windows 10, 8, 7, and Vista all support symbolic links—also known as symlinks—that point to a file or folder on your system. You can create them using the Command Prompt or a third-party tool called Link Shell Extension.

about 9 days ago - by  |  3 Replies

Every time you open a LibreOffice program, or even the LibreOffice Start Center, a splash screen displays. This splash screen serves no real purpose, so if you’d rather not see it, we’ll show you how to disable it in Windows and Linux.

about 12 days ago - by  |  Leave a reply

Linux allows you to create symbolic links, or symlinks, that point to another file or folder on your machine. The best way to do this is with the ln terminal command—though there are some graphical file managers that can create symbolic links too.

about 13 days ago - by  |  2 Replies

CyanogenMod is dead, killed by parent company Cyanogen. The community is attempting to pick up the pieces and create a new project, LineageOS, based on the code. But it’s a reminder that open source software isn’t all sunshine, rainbows, and stability: in fact, it can often be very messy.

about 15 days ago - by  |  9 Replies

We’ve all downloaded files from the web to our computer. However, if you’d rather download files directly to your Google Drive account, there’s an extension for Google Chrome that allows you to do just that.

about 27 days ago - by  |  1 Reply

In the Creators Update, Windows 10’s Bash shell now allows you to run Windows binaries and standard Command Prompt commands, right from Bash. You can run both Linux and Windows programs from the same Bash shell, or even incorporate Windows commands into a Bash script.

about 27 days ago - by  |  Comments (0)

In this day and age, it is not a bad idea to be leery of untrusted executable files, but is there a safe way to run one on your Linux system if you really need to do so? Today’s SuperUser Q&A post has some helpful advice in response to a worried reader’s query.

about 29 days ago - by  |  1 Reply

PPAs, or “Personal Package Archives”, offer software that isn’t available in Ubuntu’s software repositories. Some PPAs offer newer versions of software packages that hasn’t made it to Ubuntu’s repositories yet. Installing software from a PPA is easier than compiling the software from its source code, so it’s good to know how to do it.

about 29 days ago - by  |  1 Reply

Copying a file with the Linux command line is easy. However, what if you want to copy the same file to several different locations? That’s easy, too, and we’ll show you how to do that with one command.

about 1 month ago - by  |  1 Reply

At this point, Google Chrome is prolific. You likely use it on your desktop computer and laptop, as well as any mobile devices you may have. Keeping things in sync between all of your devices is easy-peasy, thanks to Google’s handy sync settings.

about 1 month ago - by  |  2 Replies

After axing Flash for Linux in 2012, Adobe revived the Flash plugin for Firefox and other browsers on Linux in 2016. But Ubuntu still installs the old version of Flash by default, unless you go out of your way to get the new one.

about 1 month ago - by  |  5 Replies

If you’ve run into a problem deleting a file that Windows complains is “too long”, there is a dead simple solution built right into Windows—no extra apps, hacks, or work around required.

about 1 month ago - by  |  2 Replies

Maybe you’ve heard of Lynda.com, a popular website with thousands of tutorial videos teaching computer skills like programming, web design, and how to use almost any software you can think of. It’s a great service, but it’s not cheap: subscriptions start at around $20 a month, and can cost as much as $30 a month if you want offline access to the videos.

about 1 month ago - by  |  4 Replies

A Linux live USB drive is normally a blank slate each time you boot it. You can boot it up, install programs, save files, and change settings. But, as soon as you reboot, all your changes are wiped away and you’re back to a fresh system. This can be useful, but if you want a system that picks up where you left off, you can create a live USB with persistent storage.

about 1 month ago - by  |  6 Replies

A bootable USB drive is the best way to install or try Linux. But most Linux distributions—like Ubuntu—only offer an ISO disc image file for download. You’ll need a third-party tool to turn that ISO file into a bootable USB drive.

about 1 month ago - by  |  9 Replies

Have you ever wished you could download Wikipedia in its entirety, and have a copy of it on your personal computer or Android tablet? There’s actually an easy way to do this, though you will need some extra disk space and a little time.

about 1 month ago - by  |  4 Replies

Web browsers normally save your private data—history, cookies, searches, downloads, and more—and only delete it when you ask. If you are constantly clearing it, you can have any browser automatically clear private data when you close it.

about 1 month ago - by  |  1 Reply

The lost+found folder is a part of Linux, macOS, and other UNIX-like operating systems. Each file system—that is, each partition—has its own lost+found directory. You’ll find recovered bits of corrupted files here.

about 2 months ago - by  |  2 Replies

Newer isn’t always better, and the wget command is proof. First released back in 1996, this application is still one of the best download managers on the planet. Whether you want to download a single file, an entire folder, or even mirror an entire website, wget lets you do it with just a few keystrokes.

about 2 months ago - by  |  12 Replies

Product keys are becoming less and less common these days, but if you have a piece of software on your computer—and can’t find its product key—this simple program can help you extract it.

about 2 months ago - by  |  6 Replies

Keeping our passwords well secured is something that we all need to take seriously, but what do you do if a particular program or app displays your password in plain sight as you are typing it? Today’s SuperUser Q&A post has the solution to a frustrated reader’s password problem.

about 2 months ago - by  |  1 Reply

If you’ve tampered with your Chromebook—to install Windows on your Chromebook, for example—you may have replaced its BIOS with a third-party option. Here’s how to roll all your changes back and turn that Windows or Linux PC back into a Chromebook.

about 2 months ago - by  |  1 Reply

Chromebooks don’t officially support Windows. You normally can’t even install Windows—Chromebooks ship with a special type of BIOS designed for Chrome OS. But there are ways to install Windows on many Chromebook models, if you’re willing to get your hands dirty.

about 2 months ago - by  |  11 Replies
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