SEARCH

HARDWARE ARTICLES / RASPBERRY PI, DIY, GADGETS, AND MORE

Today’s Question & Answer session comes to us courtesy of SuperUser—a subdivision of Stack Exchange, a community-driven grouping of Q&A web sites.

about 1 year ago - by  |  2 Replies

The default hostname for the Raspberry Pi is, creatively enough, “raspberrypi“. What if you want a different hostname or you want to avoid hostname conflicts on your local network? Read on as we show you how to quickly change the hostname of a Linux-based device.

about 1 year ago - by  |  3 Replies

Brute-force attacks are fairly simple to understand, but difficult to protect against. Encryption is math, and as computers become faster at math, they become faster at trying all the solutions and seeing which one fits.

about 1 year ago - by  |  11 Replies

Do you have your PC, television, or other expensive electronics plugged directly into a power outlet? You shouldn’t. You should plug your gadgets into a surge protector, which isn’t necessarily the same thing as a power strip.

about 1 year ago - by  |  20 Replies

If you live in an apartment complex you’ve probably noticed more than just the passive-aggressive network IDs that your neighbors use—very likely you’ve had problems with your wireless connections dropping out, or just not being as fast as you’d like. Here’s a quick fix.

about 1 year ago - by  |  Comments (43)

The automatic white balance in digital cameras is, in most cases, a close-enough-but-not-quite solution. Read on as we show you how to use a white balance cap (both commercial and DIY) to achieve perfectly balanced color.

about 1 year ago - by  |  3 Replies

Your smartphone needs a recharge yet again and you’re miles from the charger at home; that public charging kiosk is looking pretty promising–just plug your phone in and get the sweet, sweet, energy you crave. What could possible go wrong, right? Thanks to common traits in cellphone hardware and software design, quite a few things–read on to learn more about juice jacking and how to avoid it.

about 1 year ago - by  |  11 Replies

Your computer consumes a large amount of power just idling there awaiting your command, so does charging a smartphone or tablet off one of the USB ports impose much of a demand on it?

about 2 years ago - by  |  Leave a reply

The benchmarks are clear: Solid-state drives slow down as you fill them up. Fill your solid-state drive to near-capacity and its write performance will decrease dramatically. The reason why lies in the way SSDs and NAND Flash storage work.

about 2 years ago - by  |  9 Replies

Solid-state drives are different from the mechanical, magnetic hard drives in wide use. Many of the things you’ve done with typical mechanical hard drives shouldn’t be done with newer solid-state drives.

about 2 years ago - by  |  41 Replies

Anyone with a digital camera has been there at some point: You take a photo, you check it later, and the color are ghastly–the people are sickly looking, white shirts look blue-ish, and the image just looks unappealing. Read on to learn about white balance and how to avoid smurfy family portraits.

about 2 years ago - by  |  Leave a reply

Somedays it’s fun to look at the surface level of the computing experience, and other days it’s fun to delve right into the inner workings. Today we’re taking a look at the structure of computer memory and just how much stuff you can pack into a stick of RAM.

about 2 years ago - by  |  4 Replies

Wouldn’t it be awesome if you could see exactly where your Wi-Fi coverage was hot, cold, and somewhere in between? Stop guesstimating where you might need better Wi-Fi coverage and see exactly where with today’s Wi-Fi heatmap tutorial.

about 2 years ago - by  |  11 Replies

Overclocking is the action of increasing a component’s clock rate, running it at a higher speed than it was designed to run. This is usually applies to the CPU or GPU, but other components can also be overclocked.

about 2 years ago - by  |  6 Replies

Have you ever noticed that your Internet service provider advertises their speeds as “up to” a maximum speed? You may think you’re paying for a 15 Mbps connection, but you’re actually getting an “up to 15 Mbps” connection that may be slower.

about 2 years ago - by  |  8 Replies

You’re constantly plugging and unplugging (and mounting/unmounting) your flash drive. What can you do to minimize potential data loss?

about 2 years ago - by  |  1 Reply

Chromebooks aren’t like traditional laptops. They’re locked down by default, only booting Google-approved operating systems in their default state. They’re much more limited than traditional Windows, Mac, or Linux laptops.

about 2 years ago - by  |  5 Replies

Whether net neutrality should be mandated by law is one of the biggest policy debates around the Internet, but net neutrality isn’t just a matter of law. Net neutrality is a principle that’s given us the Internet we have today.

about 2 years ago - by  |  Leave a reply

Chromebooks aren’t like traditional laptops. While they’re much simpler, they still have various useful features you may not know about. These tricks will help you take advantage of your Chromebook’s true potential.

about 2 years ago - by  |  19 Replies

Today’s Question & Answer session comes to us courtesy of SuperUser—a subdivision of Stack Exchange, a community-driven grouping of Q&A web sites.

about 2 years ago - by  |  Leave a reply

Last year we showed you how to turn the Raspberry Pi into a silent, snappy, and all around awesome media center. A lot has changed since then; we’re back with an updated guide packed with more tips, tricks, and goodies than you can shake a stick at.

about 2 years ago - by  |  20 Replies

One of the elements of film-based photography lost with the transition to digital photography is the presence of film grain. If you want to recapture the effect with your modern digital rig, read on as we show you how.

about 2 years ago - by  |  6 Replies

You’re not a Jolly Roger flying pirate, you’re just somebody that wants to backup the ebooks they paid for and read them on the devices they want to read them on. Follow along as we show you how to liberate your Kindle books.

about 2 years ago - by  |  17 Replies

Sure, everyone involved can come up with a variety of excuses — they aren’t technically misleading customers, it’s all in the fine print, and these are the standard ways the industry operates — but hardware has been advertised in many misleading ways.

about 2 years ago - by  |  25 Replies

If you are a Raspberry Pi enthusiast, then you are going to love this latest bit of news. Camera boards are now available to add to your favorite Raspberry Pi device and we have the links you need to learn more about the latest bit of hardware goodness as well as where to buy the new boards.

about 2 years ago - by  |  Leave a reply