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In the last two articles, we looked at how to prepare your PC for network access. In this installment, we are going to look at wireless network configuration.

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Much of the data on your Android phone or tablet is backed up by Google (or the individual apps you use) automatically. Your photos can also be backed up automatically, but aren’t by default. However, some data is never backed up automatically.

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Last time we looked at the theory behind IP addresses, subnet masks and name resolution, and we ended the installment with a practical guide on how to change your network settings. This time we take that knowledge and extend it by introducing things like DHCP, Network Locations, Ping and much more.

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In order to enjoy more diverse media playback on your Raspberry Pi micro computer, you need to manually enable the MPEG-2 and VC-1 codecs. Read on to see how to do so and enjoy DVD playback and more on your Pi.

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Google Chrome allows other programs on your computer to install system-wide Chrome extensions. Chrome even allows these extensions to prevent you from disabling or removing them via Chrome’s Extensions page.

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In this edition of Geek School, we are going to look at how IP addressing works. We will also cover some advanced topics like how your PC determines if the device you are communicating with is on the same network as you. We will then finish with a brief look at two name resolution protocols: LLMNR and DNS.

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Increasingly sophisticated phones and data-hungry applications make it easier than ever to blow through your data plan’s cap and incur overage charges. Read on as we show you how to manage your data use and avoid unwelcome charges.

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Have you seen that message in Windows 8 that tells you your computer is going to reboot and there is not a thing you can do about it except save your work? Here’s how to make sure that never happens again. This tip works for Windows 7 as well.

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Internet Explorer is a complex piece of software and hasn’t always been the browser choice of us geeks, but the truth is that it has gotten a lot better over the years so come and see what it has to offer.

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The Raspberry Pi makes a nice compact platform to attach an indicator light to for all sorts of projects—weather notification, new emails, etc. Read on as we show you how to hook up an LED module to your Pi and set up some basic notifications.

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The tech press is constantly writing about new and dangerous “zero-day” exploits. But what exactly is a zero-day exploit, what makes it so dangerous, and – most importantly – how can you protect yourself?

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The Caps Lock key is outdated and mostly useless. Most people will only ever trigger it accidentally. Google replaced the Caps Lock key with a Search key on its Chromebooks, and you can do the same thing on Windows.

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Entering your online-banking or email passwords on an untrusted computer – particularly one in a public place – is risky. If you had a USB drive with Linux installed on it, you could log into your accounts without fear.

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BitLocker is a lesser-known technology included in Windows that allows you to both password protect and encrypt the contents of your storage mediums.

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Browser plug-ins like Flash and Java add additional features web pages can use. However, they can also slow things down when in use or add extra security holes, particularly in the case of Java.

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Have you ever wondered why your favorite game from Windows 95 just doesn’t seem to run on Windows 7 but other applications do? Well we have the answer for you, as well as a few solutions for how to fix it.

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Browsers are packed with settings and options, many of which are hidden. Each browser has a place where you can change advanced settings that aren’t available in its standard options window.

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Hard Drives: every computer running Windows has them and none can function without them. They house all our data, so we should set them up correctly. Read on to learn more about how to use RAID to protect your data.

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Web browsers store your personal data – bookmarks, history, settings, extensions, and more – in a profile. You can create separate profiles to split things up – for example, you could have one profile for work and one for play.

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It was only a matter of time before somebody figured out how to use Metro / Modern apps in a regular desktop window, and naturally it was Stardock who came up with the solution. It’ll cost you a couple of bucks, but you can use the trial mode for free.

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In this edition of Geek School we are going to cover the configuration of hardware in Windows 7. Come join us.

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If you’re looking to relive the classic titles of yesterday on the console you have today, the Nintendo Wii makes a perfect platform for emulating older Nintendo Entertainment System and Super Nintendo Entertainment System titles—read on as we show you how.

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Android may not have Siri, but it does have Voice Actions. Voice Actions are a powerful way to perform actions – searching, getting directions, making notes, setting alarms, and more – with just your voice.

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In the second installment of our new Geek School series, we walk you through Upgrades and Migrations for Windows 7, from the perspective of learning to take your certification exam.

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Mix together one Raspberry Pi and a sprinkle of cheap external hard drives and you have the recipe for an ultra-low-power and always-on network storage device. Read on as we show you how to set up your own Pi-based NAS.

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