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Windows Vista includes a screen capture/screenshot tool that is actually pretty decent. You can take region captures or full screenshots and easily save them using this tool.

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If you are a developer using ASP.NET, one of the first things you’ll want to install on Windows 7 or Vista is IIS (internet information server). Keep in mind that your version of Windows may not come with IIS. I’m using Windows 7 Ultimate edition.

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The goal of this site is to provide computer help for everybody. When building a site like this, it’s important to cover everything, not just the more interesting how-tos. This means there will continue to be a lot of simple articles like the last two.

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I dislike the system beep on any computer, anywhere, anytime. Here’s how to turn it off in Ubuntu.

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If you are constantly tweaking your setup the way I do, the login sound will drive you crazy after a short while. Of course, if you are constantly tweaking your setup, it’s very unlikely that you are reading this article because you already know how to do this.

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TrueCrypt is a phenomenal open-source disk encryption software that runs on Windows or Linux. Unfortunately, the installer doesn’t work so well on Ubuntu Edgy, so I’ve created this article to help walk you through the process.

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SecureCRT uses the Ctrl+Ins and Shift+Ins keys for copy and paste instead of the normal windows defaults of Ctrl+C / V. The reason why this is done is because most unix or linux varieties use those keys as part of the shell.

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The default shell on most Linux operating systems is called Bash. There are a couple of important hotkeys that you should get familiar with if you plan to spend a lot of time at the command line. These shortcuts will save you a ton of time if you learn them. 

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If you are running Ubuntu Server, or even if you prefer to administer your desktop from the command line, you will want to be able to see what packages are available for update. Ubuntu includes a great package management tool called Aptitude that gives you an interactive environment from which to install/upgrade packages.

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Once you use the apt-get utility to install a package, sometimes it seems to disappear into nowhere. You know it’s installed, you just have no idea where.

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