How-To Geek

How to Make a Shortcut Icon to Create a System Restore Point in Windows


Windows’ System Restore doesn’t get as much praise as it once did, even though it’s still an incredibly useful feature. Judging by the feedback on our own forums, it saves people from certain destruction on a nearly daily basis. The only problem is that it takes far too many steps to manually create a new restore point. Can’t we just make a shortcut icon for it? Turns out, yes, there are a couple of ways to do it.

Create a VBScript Shortcut Icon that Creates a Restore Point with a Description

The best way to make a shortcut icon for creating a Restore Point is to point that shortcut at a little custom vbscript. You can create the script yourself. First, copy the following text:

If WScript.Arguments.Count = 0 Then
    Set objShell = CreateObject("Shell.Application")
    objShell.ShellExecute "wscript.exe", WScript.ScriptFullName & " Run", , "runas", 1
    GetObject("winmgmts:\\.\root\default:Systemrestore").CreateRestorePoint "description", 0, 100
End If

Next, open Notepad. Paste the script you copied into a blank Notepad document and then save the script with whatever name you want. Just make sure to use the file extension .vbs rather than Notepad’s default .txt, so that Windows will know you’re not saving a plain text file, but a VBScript file. You can use VBScript to do some pretty cool things, in case you’re interested in learning more.

If you don’t feel like creating your own script file, you can also download one we’ve created for you. The download actually contains two different scripts. The “CreateRestorePoint.vbs” script will prompt you to type in a description for the restore point, like the script above–which is very helpful when restoring. However, there’s also a “CreateRestorePointSilent.vbs” script that will simply create the restore point without the prompt.

CreateRestorePoint Script

Whether you create the file yourself or download it, all you have to do is double-click it and say Yes when Windows asks you if it can make changes to your PC. In the script window, just type a description of why you’re creating the restore point and click OK. Windows will create the restore point without prompting you further.


If you want to verify that the restore point is created, you can open up System Restore by searching the Start menu for “create a restore point.” On the System Properties window that opens, click “System Restore” and step through the wizard to see the available restore points.


Once you verify the script file works, you’ll likely want to save it somewhere and create a shortcut to it that you can customize. Just right-click-and-drag the file to where you want the shortcut, and choose “Create Shortcut Here” when prompted. You can then change any properties you like for the shortcut, including assigning a keyboard shortcut for launching it.

Create a Regular Shortcut Icon that Immediately Creates a Restore Point

If you prefer not to use a VBscript, or if your computer is having issues running the script, you can also create a regular shortcut that creates a script by using System Restore’s command line parameters. The only real downside of doing it this way is that you can’t add a description for your restore point.

Right-click anywhere you want to create the shortcut and on the context menu, choose New > Shortcut.


On the Create Shortcut window, copy and paste the following command in the “Type a name for this shortcut” box and then click Next.

cmd.exe /k "wmic.exe /Namespace:\\root\default Path SystemRestore Call CreateRestorePoint "My Shortcut Restore Point", 100, 7"


The command you’re pasting launches the Windows Management Instrumentation Command (WMIC) tool and tells it to create a restore point. On the next screen, type a name for your new shortcut and then click Finish.


The new shortcut will feature the Command Prompt icon. Right-click it and choose Properties.


In the properties window, on the Shortcut tab, click “Advanced.”


In the Advanced Properties window, select the “Run as administrator” option and then click OK. This will save you from having to run the shortcut as an administrator yourself each time you use it.


Change anything else you want about the shortcut–like assigning a shortcut key or a different icon–and then click OK to close the shortcut’s properties window. Now, you can just double-click your new shortcut any time you want to create a restore point.

While both these techniques for creating a shortcut take a little setup time, having that shortcut around is useful, and can save you time and headache in the future. Instead of searching for the System Restore tool and wading through several screens and a half-dozen clicks, you can create restore points immediately. And since you probably should be creating them more often that you already do, why not make it easy?

Walter Glenn is a long time computer geek and tech writer. Though he's mostly a Windows and gadget guy, he has a fondness for anything tech. You can follow him on Facebook and Twitter.

  • Published 07/7/16
  • Joe

    System restore is so underrated nowadays. It's saved me 4 or 5 times from an unbootable or barely usable machine since I got windows 10. I use the restore point creator program to create restore points on a regular basis so I don't have to manually.

  • Jack Petrilli

    None of the methods shown here worked on my Win10 Home system. I then tried creating a restore point "the old fashioned way" and that worked so I don't know what's going on here.

  • Jesse Underwood

    Try this:1. On desktop Right Click2. Scroll down to "New"3. Select "Shortcut"4. In the box "Type location of the Item"5. Put in: %system"\System32\rstrui.exe6. Click Next and then type in the Name you wantPresto you have a shortcut to System Restore


  • Jesse Underwood

    In the post by PeteOne I left out a % should be:%system%\System32\rstrui.exe

  • Paul

    When I use the VBscript method, it returns this error:

    Line: 2Char: 33Error: Invalid characterCode: 800A0408

    I just cut and paste. Anyone know what I'm doing wrong?


  • Apparently, 'how to geek' suggestions/modifications/additions/creations suck! as I rarely find anything that actually works, or the instructions (such as Pete's above for a system restore shortcut) are misleading, incorrect or wrong!

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