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(Solved) - Will Interface: DMA/ATA-100 (Ultra), run on my system [I need IDE]?

(14 posts)
  • Started 2 years ago by JamesTKirk
  • Latest reply from oldgeezer
  • Topic Viewed 1271 times

JamesTKirk
Posts: 143

The systems that I am running:
Dell Latitude D610
Compaq Evo N610c

If I get a new hd, I need one that has the RAW ide pins available, not a SATA or some peice of plastic over the pins that cannot be removed to expose the pins underneath. Reason: If I switch the hd between my two different model computers, I need to be able to plug in the RAW ide pins to the plastic interface connector that fits onto the pins "before" you put the hd into the laptop.

will a Interface: DMA/ATA-100 (Ultra), run on either of these computer systems, or have RAW ide pins exposed?

Posted 2 years ago
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Lighthouse
Posts: 13598

Please post a link to the actual bit of kit to which you are referring. I have yet to find an ide/sata adapter that could easily be used in a laptop.

Posted 2 years ago
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JamesTKirk
Posts: 143

http://www.google.com/imgres?q.....,s:87,i:59

I just now heard about EIDE.
As far as I knew there was only IDE.
But just recently, I heard that there are now 2 types of hd's: SATA
And then again, now I see there are 3!!!
My gosh, how many different types of hardware are they going to keep coming out with?
Why not just stick to the same one [IDE]? It would make things a whole lot easier!!!!!!!

The Interface is DMA/ATA-100 (Ultra), but it says that it has an EIDE connection.

Is the EIDE physically the same as IDE?

Do they look exactly the same?

Is there a plastic peice around the EIDE so that I might not be able to put a 7 pin adapter on it, or the other one?

Captain Kirk

7 pin adapter for laptop

Posted 2 years ago
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ispalten
Posts: 6259

Capt'n, don't want to burst your bubble, but there are others as well...

Basically, all except an SSD are platters that spin with electronics to control them.

The 'original' one for the IBM PC was ST506. Then as the disk drives matured there was IDE/EIDE, then SCSI, and now SATA, with versions 1, 2, and 3, offering different speeds.

IDE and EIDE also came in a variety of types, DMA, UDMA, etc.

Each one of the electronics had unique backplane connectors so you didn't plug the wrong one into it. Some used specific ports to decide who was who, others cable connections.

Some have 'converters' or 'cradles/caddies' that allow you to plug the specific drive type into and it is converted to a different electronic type.

What you referenced was a connector that will allow you to take out the CD drive in a laptop and replace it with a hard drive, of the same type of course since the CD drive is connected probably with IDE cables.

For your reading pleasure :

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hard_disk_drive
http://www.brainbell.com/tutor....._Types.htm
https://www.microsoft.com/mspress/books/sampchap/4433a.aspx
http://www.infohq.com/Computer.....ptions.htm
http://www.gocomputertraining......drive.html
http://www.home-pc-help.com/harddrivetypes.html

Generally speaking you can't plug a hard drive into a cable that doesn't fit. Some will work, like DMA and UDMA as the cable connectors are the same, but the access times would be degraded. Same goes for SATA drives.

Irv S.

Posted 2 years ago
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JamesTKirk
Posts: 143

Ispalten,
Hey bro, what'd up?

My bubble is officially burst. When I had a desktop, I NEVER had a problem with getting a new hd, and I never had to look to see if it would fit/work -- it just did...
But now with laptops, or new technology that they are coming out with, this is when the problems hit the fan.
Man its hot in here -- I just turned on the fan.

I don't know when they switched the IDE is now called ATA terminology, but don't you think that is confusing -- why not just stick to the plain 'ol "IDE"? And then there is PATA -- what is that -- the same thing as IDE?

Man, I don't know how you found that A+ certification page, but that's a good one. Wonder how hard the test is?

So basically all hard drives are the same except that some have a higher speed performance.
Okay, just to claify, what I meant by there are only being two types of hd's:
1> pin, as IDE 40-44
2> card, as SATA
I was talking about the "physical" part of it, such as what it looks like and what kind of connector that it can fit into. As SATA cannot fit into a IDE computer slot: it is PHYSICALLY not the same type of connector piece.

Wow, these are really some awesome links you found!!!!!!!!
How very thoughtful of you. How VERY kind!

And as for whether there is a plastic peice around the IDE pins that you can't take off, is this called a certain type of name? Or if the IDE pins are recessed, the 7 pin adapter might not fit/be able to put "into" the laptop.

So SATA is the only one that you can't physically plug into an IDE 7 pin adapter?

Captain Kirk

Posted 2 years ago
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Lighthouse
Posts: 13598

The name IDE was changed to PATA in 2003. They are the same technology.
IDE are 40 pin, not 7.

Posted 2 years ago
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ispalten
Posts: 6259

ST-506 interface is long gone.

To make the names more the same, drives were changed to ATA, with a P in the front for Parallel or PATA and S for Serial or SATA. Drive physical sizes can be 5 1/2, 3 1/2 or 2 1/2 inches with the last two more common today. USB Externals are a special case as are external docks for bare drives, some take PATA, others SATA and some combinations of types.

Further confusing are the mSATA drives (small mini-card SSD's) that are either put on a montherboard or PCIe card. Don't forget PCIe drives too, usually SSD's.

Even PATA (or IDE) drives have two cable wire counts, 40 and 80, although the connector and even the cable at first glance looks the same.

What is important is that you get the right drive for you computer connections and that is determined by the PORT on the motherboard. Only way to change that, and basically only on a desktop is to install a PCIe card with the ports you want. Some of those cards can NOT be bootable though.

I'm guessing about 3 or 4 years ago SATA drives started to appear. Computers shipped with this and IDE was usually used for the CD drives. At that time it was not always clear which was needed in what computer to add or replace a hard drive.

Today, the same confusion can run to RAM and video cards, again, both determined by the slots and the computer requirement.

Irv S.

Posted 2 years ago
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Lighthouse
Posts: 13598

Irv. SATA's arrived about 9 years ago. I certainly have them on my 2 6-7 year old Dell laptops.

Posted 2 years ago
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ispalten
Posts: 6259

Our 6 years old HP is IDE (I think?). My older Dell of about that age I think might have had SATA, but it was SATA I, so I guess you are right? I know they did appear first for Servers I recall, and high-end systems.

In any case, you can't mix electronics by just a cable. Even the docks have electronics in them to convert from IDE or SATA to USB interface. I think the one Jim posted a picture for was more to allow the drive to fit into the slots recession than convert anything.

Irv S.

Posted 2 years ago
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Lighthouse
Posts: 13598

True. And he is barking up the wrong tree anyway.

Posted 2 years ago
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Xhi
Posts: 6298

Not sure where this 7-pin info is coming from the Ultra DMA ATA uses a 40 pin connector with 80 wires in the cable.

ATA, IDE and EIDE With the introduction of Ultra DMA mode 4, a new type of cable ribbon was introduced in order to limit crosstalk. This type of ribbon cable adds 40 wires (for a total of 80) that are interleaved with the data wires in order to isolate them and have the same connectors as the 40-wire cable ribbon.

Posted 2 years ago
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JamesTKirk
Posts: 143

Xhi,
Don't read the description to this specfic item. This may not be the "exact" model, but it looks EXACTLY like this. And the picture does not show ANY cord attached to it. This is for a laptop device. We are not talking about desktops here. Lets not be confused now. And I am not "converting" an internal drive to an external device, so I don't know where you came up with the whole "cord" notion.

LH,
"Barking up the wrong tree?"

Dude, I gave you the EXACT model of my computer, "even" showed you a picture of what the adapter looks like (the description is different), but it PHYSICALLY looks "exactly" the same.

This adapter is what came with the computer.

So if you can't figure it out, I will give you the information again:

This is what it PHYSICALLY looks like, ignore the description:

http://www.google.com/imgres?q.....0,s:0,i:75

Dell Latitude D610

Posted 2 years ago
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Xhi
Posts: 6298

Not sure what the argument is about. If you have an actual 2.5" IDE drive the adapter will fit and it will install.

Accepted Answer · Posted 2 years ago
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oldgeezer
Posts: 211

The adapter is specific to your laptop. As I've mentioned in your other post, it allow for the drive to be inserted at an angle without bending the pins. You can swap a drive from one laptop to another as long as they both have PATA (the '40pin') connectors. Newer laptops use smaller SATA connectors and are not compatible.

Posted 2 years ago
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