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Whats the difference between system restore, reset and refresh in win 8?

(14 posts)
  • Started 1 year ago by very452001
  • Latest reply from ispalten
  • Topic Viewed 2747 times

very452001
Posts: 44

Also where do I access these options?

Posted 1 year ago
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gedstar
gedstar
Posts: 521

Read this

http://www.howtogeek.com/13242.....dows-8-pc/

Posted 1 year ago
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raphoenix
raphoenix
Posts: 14920

These two reference books would be good to have for Windows 8 Users.

http://www.howtogeek.com/books/windows-8/

http://www.amazon.com/Windows-.....+8+books#_

Posted 1 year ago
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very452001
Posts: 44

isnt there system restore in windows 8? i want to create a restore point where my settings are saved like system restore in windows 7.

Posted 1 year ago
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raphoenix
raphoenix
Posts: 14920

very452001,

Here's a tutorial for using Restore Points in Windows 8.

http://www.vikitech.com/11302/.....-windows-8

Posted 1 year ago
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very452001
Posts: 44

what other back up features windows 8 have or is it just those 3 features?

Whats the point of having refresh and reset when windows 8 already have system restore?

Posted 1 year ago
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very452001
Posts: 44

I like to know the best way to run system restore in windows 8 to avoid system restore errors?

Posted 1 year ago
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ispalten
ispalten
Posts: 6259

Use an IMAGE program that makes and image of your drives and use that to restore. You can determine the time frame between imaging and what to even image with most programs, and also the number of images to keep, thus allowing you to go back 'x' images if need be. All programs seem to differ somewhat in performance, ease of use, cost, and features.

Some are Macrium Reflect, Norton's Symantec System Recovery 2013, True Image, Easus backup, Paragon Backup, and others... some have both a FREE and FEE version, some are automatic and some are manual.

You should read this too --> https://www.pcworld.com/article/170688/7_backup_strategies.html

Windows 'capabilities' for 'recovery' are not as good and a complete image recovery. With most of those from Windows you'll either possibly lose SOME data or everything and be starting in the worst case from scratch again having to re-install a lot of programs and suffer personal data loss.

Irv S.

Posted 1 year ago
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very452001
Posts: 44

But isnt IMAGE programs take longer to do?

Posted 1 year ago
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germ-x
germ-x
Posts: 5310

Not as long as a complete reinstall including all your applications and Data

Posted 1 year ago
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warlock
warlock
Posts: 4100

Worth the time if you ever need them.

Posted 1 year ago
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ispalten
ispalten
Posts: 6259

Almost ALL Image programs run in the background and if you have a fairly modern computer with sufficient RAM that it doesn't start swapping you NEVER know it is running. You do need a drive that you can store the images on, and it the size of the freespace on that drive will determine the number of images (backup dates) you can save. Only caveat, if you do do 'live' backups, that is you are running the computer as it is backing up, there is a 'slim' chance you might change a file after it was saved away. Solution is to do an off-line backup (that is use the CD for the product to do the backup) or not use the computer during the backup.

Beats ANY built-in Windows solution. Can disable System Restore too and recover its space.

Irv S.

Posted 1 year ago
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germ-x
germ-x
Posts: 5310

Irv, with today's large HDD's keeping the system restore active isn't that big a deal. But as you say it will save some space. Suggest a small utility for scheduled backups between images if you use the same apps on a regular basis.
Doublesafety
http://download.cnet.com/Doubl.....48132.html

Posted 1 year ago
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ispalten
ispalten
Posts: 6259

Programs like Symantec's System Recovery also include that function as well Germ. You can handle images differently from files and folders on different schedules. I think Paragon, Acronis, and others also have the same capability. Why get 2 programs?

I guess for "safety's sake" a program that will do backups to the 'cloud' or a network are best. However these are usually slower and can tie up a slow internet connection. Carbonite is one that many use, but if you have Internet limits that can be a problem.

Irv S.

Posted 1 year ago
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