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what does anyone like about windows7 ?

(62 posts)
  • Started 5 years ago by 0zSpitt
  • Latest reply from jd2066
  • Topic Viewed 9202 times

whs
whs
Posts: 17584

Rick, you are a real "scholar". Keep us on our toes.

Posted 5 years ago
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jd2066
jd2066
Posts: 3814

@raphoenix

If you look at the old 2K/XP example screen, you can see that that each Fly-Out Menu eventually ends up to a link to a specific program application on the machine.
Indeed, the issue is remembering everything.
Most people don't think "I want to write a letter" and then think I need to go to "Start Button -> Programs -> Microsoft Office -> Microsoft Word".
Only power users/geeks like you and me would make that connection and not all the time.
The important thing to relize is that many computers come with a ton of programs pre-installed and many users don't have a clue what Microsoft Windows or Microsoft Office even is.
Microsoft is stuck with the task of attempting to make it easy for users to figure things out.

The way I have the machine setup, the Fly-Outs do so (automatically) as the mouse is moved very quickly over them so it just takes (2) quick clicks to open and run any program on the machine within the menu system.
It's nice that you can set that up but many people wouldn't have a clue how to set-up the fly-out menus to work like they want too.

In Win7, if one has to Manually PIN each program application to the task bar, seems like that would be a big mess constructing such.
Indeed, it would be but Microsoft designs things like pinning for people who only use a few things like Internet, E-mail, Photo editing, Video Editing, Word Processing and a couple other things on a regular basis.
Usually it's just power users that want and/or need to run zillions of programs every day.

Notice the example quick launch bar with just a few items.
Indeed and the taskbar pinning is designed replace the Quick Launch and the normal taskbar buttons to save space and be more convenient.

Can't imagine everything on the machine PINNED to the task bar but guess it can be done.
No, I can't either but I have seen users with a Quick Launch that has 10-20 shortcuts in it which really shrinks the available space for taskbar buttons. Some users do this as they don't know of a better way and some users just get stuck with it because a ton of programs they install put shortcuts there they don't know how to remove.
Taskbar pinning helps this because programs shouldn't be able to alter the users pinned programs and the user can easiy pin a running program by right-clicking on the button and selecting "Pin to taskbar".

Likewise, creating a desktop shortcut link to each program application would really clutter up the desktop.
Indeed, the same thing as the Quick Launch can happen with the desktop which is in part why Start Menu pinning exists.

Gadgets are fun, but I'm really not into Cute Internet clocks, calendars, weather, etc., etc.
Those are not the only gadgets available, just the only ones shipped with Windows Vista/7.
If you look online there are gadgets that let you pin your favorite shortcuts to them. I think whs uses "Application Launcher V3" for Windows Sidebar and at the moment I use the included toolbar gadget with Desktop Sidebar as it works a lot better.
There is also a contacts gadget I use to see if people with Instant Messenging are online too.
The Clock, Date and uptime gadgets are quite useful too.

Have a loose leaf Cheat Book now with pages containing Shell Commands, Command Prompt Commands, Shortcut Key Documentation, etc., etc.
Ok, that works but someone shouldn't have to have a cheat sheet just to get a couple things done on a computer and thus why Microsoft is attempting new methods to store favorite programs.

so was worried that I will have to add more sheets for Search Commands or try to Construct some type of quick PINNED menu system.
No, I don't think you will. There is already a way to get the Quick Launch back in Windows 7 and a third-party developer will probably add a toolbar system to support the old way for users that want that. True Launch Bar may already do that, I'm not sure as I haven't tried it.

I guess MS has done research and knows best what the public likes so will deal with Win7 when the time comes.
Microsoft has certainly done research and hopes they know what the public likes but they don't always do as a lot of the bad publicity for Windows Vista shows.
There is really nothing they can do to make everyone happy.

BTW: Still trying to learn the theory behind The New Boot Manager System so there are many challenges ahead.
There is another topic entirely but one thing I can say for sure after dealing with the NT Boot Loader (NTLDR) that Windows 2000/XP had and the DOS/Windows 3.X/Windows 9X boot loader (which really really sucks), the Windows Vista/7 boot loader (bootmgr) is miles better in many many ways.

Will be glad when there are some good books published on Win7 as that will make it easier than just experimenting.
That would certainly be nice.
Most of what I know is from reading Microsoft help pages, Microsoft employee blogs, far to much search engine queries and way way to much experimenting.
The amount of experimenting I needed to do before I understood Windows XP RTM and then XP SP2 was far to much.
The same with Windows Vista.
Windows 7 just happens to have very minor changes to Windows Vista, most of which match what I read Microsoft's goal for Windows Vista was.
I think Microsoft really intended and wanted to release what Windows 7 will be as Windows Vista but they needed to get something out the door as it had already been 5 years sense Windows XP came out and what they had for Windows Vista RTM was quite good already, just not well documented so many people were not prepared for the changes it had.

Best Regards and Thanks for the Explanation
You're Welcome. I'm glad to explain what I know*.

* Or at least what I think I know :)

Posted 5 years ago
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