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Vista x32 vs Vista x64

(7 posts)
  • Started 5 years ago by Gmanlink
  • Latest reply from LH
  • Topic Viewed 4087 times

Gmanlink
Posts: 60

I just recently heard about Vista x64.
I heard some bad points about Vista x64. Such as that Vista x64 isn't compatible with some programs with Vista x32.
In addition, those programs that aren't compatible are somehow able to run on Vista x64, but at a seemingly slower pace than Vista x32.
Regardless, what really is the difference between the two Versions of Vista?

Posted 5 years ago
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thegeek
The Geek
Posts: 2059

The main difference is that 32-bit Windows can only access about 3.2GB of memory, but 64-bit doesn't have that limitation.

The only software I've had trouble running on 64-bit (which I run on my main desktop) is either certain software that installs low-level drivers or system hooks, or some media conversion applications, but typically there's an alternative that works just fine. I can't even think of a piece of software I really wanted to use that doesn't run.

I've never noticed any speed problems at all... the fact that I can use 8GB of memory makes it kinda irrelevant.

Posted 5 years ago
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Gmanlink
Posts: 60

Well yeah, 8GB of memory does make that sort of irrelevant. Then again, I only have 2GB of Memory. And I don't think that I plan on adding anymore since I'll probably never use 4 or more GB of memory.

Unless I start running a ton of programs.
XD

Posted 5 years ago
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jd2066
jd2066
Posts: 3814

The other issue is that the 64-bit edition can not run 16-bit programs.
For nearly all post 1996 software, it is 32-bit or 64-bit. Which would mean you can run nearly all your post 1996 software on the 64-bit edition but that isn't always the case as some 32-bit uses 16-bit componets in places like the installer. Recently I was helping someone try to get Creatacard 3 to run on the 64-bit edition which is made a lot harder due to the installer for it being 16-bit. One needs to figure out of the files the programs needs and copy them to computer manually. At the moment we still haven't got the Creatacard 3 to work.
Why a company would use a 16-bit installer for a 32-bit program I don't know.

Then there are the actual 16-bit programs you may want to run. I have some old games from 1995 that I like to play some times.

Though with the big processer and amount of memory available on 64-bit computers you can easily run a 32-bit copy of Windows in a Virtual Machine to run the 16-bit programs.

Posted 5 years ago
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jmcguire
jmcguire
Posts: 552

I agree with jd2066, I really don't know why a company would use a 16-bit installed in a recent program, but because companies do it, there needs to be some simple workaround in 64-bit operating systems.

As a side question, could one legally purchase 1 copy of Vista Ultimate, partition their hard drive, and install the 32-bit edition on one partition, and the 64-bit on another? It is technically the same OS and it is on one computer. Just curious.

Posted 5 years ago
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jd2066
jd2066
Posts: 3814

@jmcguire: I just read the Windows Vista license agreement to answer your side question.
As I understand it, you can only install one copy of Windows Vista to a computer at a time and sense both the 32-bit and 64-bit versions are part of the copy, installing both would count as 2 copies and violate the EULA.

Posted 5 years ago
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LH
LH
Posts: 20002

On a similar note. If you Upgrade your XP to Vista, the XP key will be invalidated by MS.

Posted 5 years ago
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