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solid state drive for hard drive replacement

(9 posts)
  • Started 5 years ago by samuellisy
  • Latest reply from whs
  • Topic Viewed 738 times

samuellisy
Posts: 4

Dear all I want to replace my current hard drive with a solid state drive, I know how to install and replace the old drive but the problem is that I want it to be my OS drive, so it is used for booting up my OS ( my main drive). What do I have to do before and after I replace it?
Sth like reinstalling the OS? Find all the drivers i need and copy it out ? Do I do it these before removing the old drive or after i put the new blank drive in?
Thank you all for your help & time

Posted 5 years ago
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ProstheticHead
Posts: 3281

WHS will be the the guy you need to speak to, should be around here somewhere :)

Probably best to reinstall I'd have guessed.

Posted 5 years ago
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whs
Posts: 17584

I am here - nice of my friends to call me.
Well, short answer is reinstall, provided you have an installation disk. Else, you have to clone your system to an external disk with an imaging program ( e.g. Acronis). But that usually only works well if the original partition is smaller or equal in size than the target partition on the SSD. The imaging programs say they can image to a smaller partition, but i have never been able to make it work. You need, of course, the boot CD which you can easily burn from the imaging program.
But there is a LOT more to SSDs. I suggest you educate yourself first on the intricacies of the SSDs. The OCZ Forum is a good source ( http://www.ocztechnologyforum.com/forum/ ). For Windows7 you must absolutely look for a disk with Trim because Win7 supports Trim ( http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/TRIM_(SSD_command) ) Problem is, that only few SSDs support it.
Give me more info on your current system, etc. and what SSD you are looking at and I give you more hints.

Posted 5 years ago
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samuellisy
Posts: 4

to whs, first of all thank you for your wonderful help and information, I would definitely look more into the differences of SSD and their compatibility to different OS.

Now, let me explain my case with more detail.
I am planning to buy a new laptop and although some of the custumizable brands have SSD as options, most of them still does not have it.
The main use of my laptop would be some mathamatical programming in softwares such as MatLab, so i definitely dont need super large hard drive, and as i have heard, SSD are faster in loading large programs and stuff.
Also, from my past experience, the previous laptops I bought does not comes with an installation disk and OS disk, instead they use a portion of the build in hard drive to store all the drives and the OS as a back up data and they comes with their own branded system recovery software.
I was wondering if it is possible for me to burn all of these into my DVDs?
What should I do with them after I install, say the ssd, into my system, do i just put the disks in the computer and it would ask me to click setup and everything would be done, or do i have to type in specific commands to load the files from the disk?
I'm totally new to windows 7 so I'm not sure what would happen.
I hope these information helps

Posted 5 years ago
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whs
Posts: 17584

Let me tell you right away, a Laptop is not a good candidate for an SSD. Reason is that affordable SSDs ($150 to $300 in the US) are very small (30 to 80GB) and are really only intended for the operating system. Since you say that you need a "super large harddrive", you are in the wrong zons with SSDs.
A much better solution would be a Desktop with an SSD for the system and a fast Raptor HDD for the data. But that is not something you can buy off the shelf - and Btw, whatever they offer as SSDs with the laptop, don't touch it. Those are low end SSDs that are useless. The only ones worth having right now are either the "Intel X25-M G2 Postville" or the "OCZ Vertex or Vertex Turbo". They come in different capacities.
The installation of the operating system can be accomplished. But first we have to sort out whether an SSD is the right solution for your application.
PS: are you located in the US or another country - I ask because of the prices and links

Posted 5 years ago
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samuellisy
Posts: 4

sorry I mean I do not need a large hard drive, a small one holding the OS and a few Gig of space would do, so I'm thinking of a 64G or a 80G.

Let me go take a look at the SSDs you just mentioned :)

I'm currently in Canada, but I travel to US back and forth so buying in US online/instore is availble for me.

Posted 5 years ago
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whs
Posts: 17584
 
samuellisy
Posts: 4

wow, all 3 of them look great, i went to newegg and had a very detailed look at the reviews and spec and stuff.

Is there a big difference from the preformance and reliability between intel and ocz? I mean intel sounds solid but people in forums say that it's a bit overpriced atm, not sure if it's true or not.

Posted 5 years ago
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whs
Posts: 17584

Intel has always been high in price. The main problem with Intel is that they had problems recently with their Trim Firmware. I am not sure whether they got that fixed. For the OCZ Vertex, you must make sure you get Firmware level 1.4. or 1.4.1. (depending on model) or higher. Level 1.4. was the first to support Trim, and that is important for long term write performance. You can, of course, always flash the firmware yourself. But that is not that obvious if you have never done it. In that case it is better to send the SSD to OCZ and have them do it. They do that free of charge. You just need to get a support ticket on their website.

Posted 5 years ago
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