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Seagate drive taps eSATA ......

(10 posts)
  • Started 5 years ago by raphoenix
  • Latest reply from raphoenix
  • Topic Viewed 1140 times

raphoenix
raphoenix
Posts: 14920

There has been much debate concerning USB and eSATA External Storage Solutions.
This link is posted for info with no comment.

http://www.computerworld.com/a.....#38;nlid=1

Kindest Regards,
Rick P. ♥ :)

Posted 5 years ago
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ScottW
ScottW
Posts: 6609

I don't remember any debate here at HTG forums. eSATA is known to be faster but more expensive and has less market penetration. USB 2.0 attached storage is slower, cheaper, and wildly popular. Firewire, being squeezed between the two, is unlikely to ever take off. In my opinion, USB 2.0 is fast enough for most people's secondary storage needs.

It's nice to see the raw transfer numbers for that Seagate from the Computerworld article, but I would like to have seen some real world results as well. For example, how much faster would a Norton Ghost backup be when using eSATA vs USB? Or how many video streams can be recorded to the external drive with eSATA vs USB? Those types of tests would be interesting to help people decide if eSATA is worth the extra money to them.

Posted 5 years ago
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whs
whs
Posts: 17584

It is also worth noting that at the end of this year they schedule to come out with USB3 which is 10 times as fast as USB2 and would solve all our problems (for the moment at least).
I notice the real difference between USB2 and eSata when taking a full Ghost checkpoint or recovering from one. On one my systems with a second internal drive on eSata it takes about only 25% of the time than on the other systems with USB attached disks. The same is true for Video publishing. I always publish to the second internal disk and then copy to the USB disk (where I keep my videos) - rather than directly to the USB disk. That is a LOT faster - like 5 times at least.

Posted 5 years ago
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raphoenix
raphoenix
Posts: 14920

The article was posted for info with no comment.
Feel sure someone or other interested party will perform testing down the road.
No OEM claim goes unchallenged for long in today's competitive markets.
Kindest Regards,
Rick P. ♥ :)

Posted 5 years ago
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ScottW
ScottW
Posts: 6609

whs, the "e" in eSATA is for external connections, so what do you mean by "internal drive on eSata"? I'm guessing that the second drive you are referring to is an internal SATA drive. So you use the USB attached storage for copy large files and not for performance sensitive operations -- that is exactly what secondary storage is for. It's the same for me. I do my Ghost backups to an internal SATA drive first, then copy them to external USB drives later.

Posted 5 years ago
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raphoenix
raphoenix
Posts: 14920

It's according to how the eSATA Controller is configured in the Bios setup.
For instance on this board, the eSATA controller can be set to:
1. No Raid
2. Raid 0
3. Raid 1
If set to NO Raid, then the Internal eSATA Port acts as just another Internal SATA Drive Port in (Addition) to the main Internal Chipset SATA Ports.

Kindest Regards,
Rick P. ♥ :)

Posted 5 years ago
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whs
whs
Posts: 17584

Ya, right. It is just a second internal drive - I guess I should have said Sata drive. Btw: as far as firewire goes, only the FW800 helps a little. The more common FW400 is actually slower than USB2. I guess it was a good idea during the USB1 times. Wasn't it Apple that invented that?
Regarding the use of external drives: I use it for different things. As you said, to store large data sets that are not performance sensitive. To carry my files between my 2 homes. But I also make a monthly backup of my Ghost shadows and then detach the disk - just to make sure that I have a backup of the internal Ghost disk. You never know. It may be a little exaggerated, but it is a little price to pay for safety.

Posted 5 years ago
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raphoenix
raphoenix
Posts: 14920

@whs,

That's interesting.

Of course having an interest in aviation, I read somewhere that the most modern fighters use a Firewire IEEE (B) bus in the the aircraft's electronic systems. Firewire communicates (talks) differently between nodes so that would make sense.
Kindest Regards,
Rick P. ♥ :)

Posted 5 years ago
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ScottW
ScottW
Posts: 6609

I would call that a "Fly by Firewire" control system! :-)

Posted 5 years ago
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raphoenix
raphoenix
Posts: 14920

@ScottW,
You know, you may not be far from correct in some sub-systems.
I know they like optical but they have to have a lot of different redundancy at mach 2.5

Kindest Regards,
Rick P. ♥ :)

Posted 5 years ago
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