SEARCH

The How-To Geek Forums Have Migrated to Discourse

How-To Geek Forums / Windows Vista

Run CCleaner before computer shuts down

(17 posts)
  • Started 5 years ago by alexmoba
  • Latest reply from BobJam
  • Topic Viewed 11670 times

alexmoba
Posts: 2

Just after seeing the article about running CCleaner on a scheduel I wondered if it was possible to run it before my computer shuts down, normally I run CCleaner just before i shut down my computer, but I cound't find this kind of event on the task schedueller, is it possible that when I shut down my computer this event triggers the CCleaner and the my computer shuts down?

Posted 5 years ago
Top
 
raphoenix
raphoenix
Posts: 14920

alexmoba,

Make a shortcut to ccleaner program and put it in your quick launch tray or on your desktop.

Click and run the program as often as you like.

I run it about every 10 minutes or so after visiting several websites just to keep the caches clean of all the cookies and tracking "stuff".

No need to keep all that cookie "stuff" in your machine.

Regards,
Rick P.

Posted 5 years ago
Top
 
Antman
Antman
Posts: 164

This might be more what you were after to run a script at shutdown:

http://forum.piriform.com/lofi.....11072.html

Posted 5 years ago
Top
 
Antman
Antman
Posts: 164

Or there is this freeware program that runs stuff at shutdown:

http://www.fileware.com/products.htm#LastChance

This looks like a simpler solution, as it won't require you to do any scripting.

Posted 5 years ago
Top
 
raphoenix
raphoenix
Posts: 14920

Antman,

Good idea HOWEVER the only problem with file sync is that it slows machine down if not needed across a network. Normally, I disable such in the registry but there can be a need for doing it depending on computer usage.

Regards,
Rick P.

Posted 5 years ago
Top
 
alexmoba
Posts: 2

Raphoenix,

Thats what I usually do with the quick launch icon, but i'm just that lazy and want everything that automated :)

Posted 5 years ago
Top
 
raphoenix
raphoenix
Posts: 14920

alexmoba,

Don't tag yourself as being lazy, I prefer the descriptive phrase of "Working Smarter" :)

Kindest Regards,
Rick P.

Posted 5 years ago
Top
 
ScottW
ScottW
Posts: 6609

Alexmoba, I like the batch file idea. Any external application will be running all the time doing nothing until it's time to shutdown. For me, a program that is running all the time, though it will be used rarely, is the same kind of clutter that CCleaner is used to expunge! Also, with a pointer to the script on your desktop or quick launch bar, you can use a hotkey to shutdown.

To all, why so much cleaning? Every 10 minutes? Tracking cookies are not really dangerous.

Posted 5 years ago
Top
 
SarahJames
SarahJames
Posts: 6581

Just make a batchfile in notepad.

Recently read an article on exactly this, so I'll give the details:)

@ECHO OFF
ECHO CCleaner is cleaning your PC ...
"C:\Program Files\CCleaner\CCleaner.exe" /AUTO
ECHO.
ECHO Windows will be shutdown in 10 seconds ...
ShutDown.exe-s-t10

And there you have it.
Copy this text to notepad and save as Shutdown.bat

Posted 5 years ago
Top
 
SarahJames
SarahJames
Posts: 6581

Edit: Mind you - the path to Ccleaner must be as above or you must set it to the path where you have it installed:)
And set CCleaner to remove files from the temp folder that are older then 48 hours, so you won't delete any files that are needed for a program you installed and that was waiting for a reboot.

Edit2: in the article there was also included the option to defragment before shutdown and setting it to be run once a week.
So I edited it a bit and I hope I did it right (according to the article this should be it:-D).

Posted 5 years ago
Top
 
BobJam
BobJam
Posts: 1052

Echoing ScottW's last comment about "cleaning", I would cite the article at this web site:
http://www.edbott.com/weblog/archives/000643.html

The article on this site is titled "Why I don’t use registry cleaners"

Though it's specific to registry cleaners, and CCleaner is more general, it still applies to cleaning.

An excerpt from that article:

" . . . what possible performance benefits can you get from “cleaning up” unneeded registry entries and eliminating a few stray DLL files? Even in the best-case scenario the impact should be trivial at best. Maybe a second or two here and there, maybe a few kilobytes of freed-up RAM, and I’m being generous. How can you balance those against the risk that the utility will “clean” (in other words, delete) something you really need, causing a program or feature to fail?"

Another excerpt from the same article that really drives home the author's point (and I agree):

"The Registry is an enormous database and all this “Cleaning” really doesn’t amount to much…I’ve said this before, but I liken it to “sweeping out one parking space in a parking lot the size of Montana” … a registry “tweak” here and there is desirable or even necessary sometimes, but random “cleaning”, especially for the novice, is inviting disaster."

And so you don't think I'm bashing CCleaner, here's another excerpt from the same article (which I also agree wth btw):

"I do like the free CCleaner. I’ve cleaned out 1 GB or more of junk on friends computers and it does make the system a little more responsive. You don’t get as many unexplained pauses. This is a problem with the lack of multithreading in Windows Explorer most of the time when it times out on dead resources like a detached network drive. I thought I remember reading something on the Vista features that fixes this by supporting multiple threads.

Other than that, I’ve made sure that I don’t have any dead links the system is trying to access on the desktop that are sure to cause a 30 second lockup even if I drag an icon across the dead link icon. Ccleaner also does a nice job removing a lot of that junk. The combination of MSCONFIG and Ccleaner works wonders."

The author is not saying, nor am I, that some cleaning now and then, like getting rid of temp files, is good and necessary for efficient performance. But I would ask the same question as ScottW . . . "Every 10 minutes?"

Just my two cents on the general topic of cleaning . . .

Posted 5 years ago
Top
 
raphoenix
raphoenix
Posts: 14920

TO ALL and @ScottW,

Why so much cleaning ??

Because it is SO easy to click the icon in the quick launch tray while waiting on a reply and takes no time at all (LOL). No real necessity !! (LOL)

Regards,
Rick P.

Posted 5 years ago
Top
 
jack7h3r1pp3r
jack7h3r1pp3r
Posts: 2815

i used to have to do a lot of cleaning on my dads computer but that was just because he went to a lot of iffy sites and wouldn't really do any of it himself but on my own i clean thing about once a week or once a month depends on how much stuff i install or what ever.

Posted 5 years ago
Top
 
BobJam
BobJam
Posts: 1052

Yes, jack7h3r1pp3r, installations DO create a lot of useless temp files after the install, and unfortunately most install packages DON'T clean up after themselves. (They also leave useless remnants in the registry.) So, if these useless temp files are not cleaned out about every week or so (or every ten minutes in raphoenix's/Rick P's case <grin>), then much like your Dad's machine, they accumulate and eventually get very cumbersome for the OS.

If a user does a lot of installs of Googled free stuff frequently, which many do, then that "once a week" idea is a good one. Otherwise, I agree with you that once a month is sufficient.

Posted 5 years ago
Top
 
whs
whs
Posts: 17584

The downside of frequent cleaning is the loss of the logon info to all the sites you visit on a regular basis. That can be a pain, having to always login anew. That's why I use CCleaner and others sparingly. In terms of disk space there is not much to be gained anyhow.

Posted 5 years ago
Top
 
SarahJames
SarahJames
Posts: 6581

Nothing wrong with keeping your system neat and tidy, so long as you also make regular backups.
And for privacy reasons it isn't such a bad idea to run Ccleaner regularly.
Also, when your IE cache get's very full you may run into unexpected problems.
A friend of mine wondered why she couldn't save animated gifs in IE - after we had searched long and hard the solution was she had to clean the internet temporary files-folder (a.k. just run disk cleanup). Duh ...

Registry cleaners can do a lot of damage if you don't know what your doing (he, they give a warning about that, now why should that be ....), but saying there is nothing to be gained isn't true either.

I've had a lot of troubles with my mht files that wouldn't display properly.
After trying just about everything I had given up, then by chance I ran RegCure and all of a sudden mht was (and is) back to normal.

For safety:
They always have a function to create a backup before deleting / changing anything, so restore is in fact easy. Creating a restorepoint before you run a regcleaner is also a good idea.
And/or use ERUNT.

Enjoy,
Sarah.

Posted 5 years ago
Top
 
BobJam
BobJam
Posts: 1052

Sarah,

I'm not saying that registry cleaners are necessarily bad, and used carefully as you pointed out they can be lifesavers, BUT . . . novices have to be careful about what they choose. A lot of people Google for registry cleaners, and the results are dangerous.

Here is a link to an article on Registry Cleaners that I'd highly recommend be read by anyone thinking about using one:

http://asknerd.net/bestregistrycleaner.html

An excerpt:

" . . . The problem with most registry repair titles is that they are based on the same open source software script . . . they are being sold by companies that didn't develop them - and therefore have no real understanding of their function or even how they work. The result is that you risk installing an inferior piece of software that can permanently damage your computer"

Another excerpt:

"The issue lies in the explosion of spam-review sites which are nothing more then websites promoting affiliate links under the guise of an official " review " site. There main goal is to accomplish one thing - to send you to the site they are promoting and hoping you buy the product they are selling - if you do, they get up to a 75% cut of the sale. In other words, their reviews are up for sale - and are not anything but thinly veiled sales pitches. For example, if you do a search for the term " Paid Survey " or " Registry Repair " you'll notice that the paid listings all include sites that say " read our review " or " warning, don't download anything until you read this..."

The author (the "Nerd", much like the "Geek") does give a "fair and balanced" look at the topic and does not bash registry cleaners per se, so that seems to add some credibility to the theme.

Posted 5 years ago
Top
 



Topic Closed

This topic has been closed to new replies.

Get Free Articles in Your Inbox!

Join 134,000 newsletter readers

Email:

Go check your email!