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Puppy Linux

(8 posts)
  • Started 1 year ago by AdrianK-IT
  • Latest reply from AdrianK-IT
  • Topic Viewed 949 times

AdrianK-IT
AdrianK-IT
Posts: 107

Puppy Linux seems to have a certain popularity on this forum (though I've noted there are sometimes problems booting it after the install).
What is it that folk like about it? What makes it a good choice?
I guess the small size of the .iso file is one thing. What else?

Posted 1 year ago
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whs
whs
Posts: 17584

I would say mainly the small size. It is good for recovering data but for a day to day operation the GUI is a bit awkward.

Posted 1 year ago
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CompWiz
CompWiz
Posts: 864

To add to whs's comment in some cases users utilize puppy linux as a rescue CD.

Posted 1 year ago
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AdrianK-IT
AdrianK-IT
Posts: 107

I've installed Slacko Puppy to investigate further, on an old, OS-less PC. I can see why folk have problems booting it after an install, since you have to set up GRUB as a separate process afterwards, and you are seriously warned off putting it in the MBR. Sensible advice to prevent multiboot foul-ups, but just what you need to do in a single boot PC. (All the boot problems I noted seemed to be trying to create that scenario.)

Posted 1 year ago
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whs
whs
Posts: 17584

Because of the Grub, Linux is always messy for double booting. I run my Ubuntu in Virtual Box, Fedora from a USB stick and Puppy from a DVD (that I use only when I have to recover data from friend's PCs that did not take the right precautions).

Posted 1 year ago
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AdrianK-IT
AdrianK-IT
Posts: 107

I'm fairly comfortable with multibooting Windows and Linux, but would always normally install GRUB to the partition boot sector, then copy the sector across into a file on the Windows partiton using 'dd', and reference that from the Windows boot loader(s). So much easier to edit those than GRUB, which is nowadays compiled on-the-fly from scripts.
Problem with Puppy is that when you set up GRUB as advised to a partition boot sector, it doesn't tell you how to access that from your existing boot loader, nor do it for you!
Booting Linux from Windows (rather than the other way round) also makes it so much easier to uninstall Linux if you want to.
PS I also have LinuxMint12 in a VirtualBox, so can run that and Win7 simultaneously, and use my fave Windows tools for eg screenshots etc.

Posted 1 year ago
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whs
whs
Posts: 17584

Maybe you can manipulate it with EasyBCD: http://www.snapfiles.com/get/easybcd.html

And here is some documentation: http://neosmart.net/wiki/displ.....ation+Home

Posted 1 year ago
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AdrianK-IT
AdrianK-IT
Posts: 107

Been investigating its potential as a recovery environment. It's quite impressive, since it has a (to me, bewildering) variety of tools. I particularly like the way the GRUB setup tool automatically backs up the MBR first. Also liked Pmount, and the way it automatically mounts to a /mnt directory with the same name as the /dev designation. And, best of all, that you don't have to sudo commands!

Posted 1 year ago
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