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Point Recycle Bin to another drive

(14 posts)
  • Started 3 years ago by GTW
  • Latest reply from ispalten
  • Topic Viewed 2132 times

GTW
Posts: 31

I have two hard drives. C: drive and a D: drive.

Any way to point the Recycle Bin away from the C: drive to the D: drive in Windows 7 Professional?

Posted 3 years ago
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LH
Posts: 20002

No. Every drive has to have its own bin.

Posted 3 years ago
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GTW
Posts: 31

All right. How do I create a Recycle Bin for my D: drive and have everything I delete point to that?

The bin for C: can stay. It's just everything is bypassed from it.

Posted 3 years ago
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nt0xik8ed
Posts: 768

i did this but instead of "delete" i had to used "send to" and it really didn't delete it but was sent to a file where it could be deleted manually. on d drive make a new folder. rename it Recycle Bin. right click on the folder and select properties, click on customize and select the recycle bin. send the finished folder to the desktop rename it again removing the word "shortcut". follow THIS tutorial to set up a right click menu and download This to delete contents.

Posted 3 years ago
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LH
Posts: 20002

If you delete a recycle bin, Windows will automatically create a new one when needed.

Posted 3 years ago
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nt0xik8ed
Posts: 768

i meant if you delete something instead of going to the recycle bin click on "send to" the new folder named Recycle Bin on d: drive. not delete the recycle bin from c: drive.

Posted 3 years ago
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LH
Posts: 20002

Sorry nt0xik8ed, that statement was not pointed at you. It was just info. I can't see why the OP is trying to create a bin on D:, when Windows will do it for him.

Posted 3 years ago
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ispalten
Posts: 6259

Windows has its own Recycle bin. When you delete a file (except for LARGE ones that can't fit in it) it goes there, a special folder, that when you right mouse button on it (or open it) you can EMPTY it.

Sure, you can create a like named folder on a drive, and send files to it, but this is NOT a recycle bin. It is a FOLDER. It doesn't have the same capabilities as the real Windows one. You can not restore from it, that is have Windows put the file back where it came from automatically, nor empty it. If you want to restore, you must know where it came from and put it back. If you want to empty it, you must DELETE the files. If you STILL have the REAL Recycle Bin, the files will go there. You can however in the Recycle Bin properties have deleted item bypass the bin.

Me, I'd leave it as-is and let Windows handle the deletions.

Irv S.

Posted 3 years ago
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nt0xik8ed
Posts: 768

LH i had just woke up, i should never try to read anything that early. ispalten, exactly, i was creating the illusion of a recycle bin out of a folder.

Posted 3 years ago
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ispalten
Posts: 6259

I suspect what the OP wanted to do was remove the RC from C: and have all that would go there to the one on his D: drive, I guess he had more space there? Basically, it can't be done. I'm not even sure one can do anything with the Recycle bin but change its size or not hold files, but not REMOVE it from the system, that is have it reserve space and be a folder on a drive? I guess setting it to 0 bytes and have files be deleted instantly would be the best solution?

Irv S.

Posted 3 years ago
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LH
Posts: 20002

There is a setting to bypass the bin completely, already there.

Posted 3 years ago
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ispalten
Posts: 6259

@LH, know that, but will that REMOVE the RC from the drive is the real question? I've not seen anything that says the folder will be removed from the drive if you bypass the RC? Have not tried setting either the bypass or setting the size to 0 to see what happens.

Irv S.

Posted 3 years ago
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LH
Posts: 20002

Irv. No. That will not remove the bin. But if it is hidden, and always empty, I can't see the problem !

Posted 3 years ago
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ispalten
Posts: 6259

LH, I'm assuming it is a 'space' issue? Catch-22 here I guess. Low disk space on C:, plenty on D:, but the RC is taking up space that might be usable by C: if it weren't there? I assume this is the problem the OP has and thinks it can be solved by directing C: deletes to the D: drive?

If one can set the RC size to 0 or very low at least, and do not put deletions in the RC, this effectively removes it, but the folder might still be there?

Still, why mess with it. Someday IT WILL save you some grief.

Irv S.

Posted 3 years ago
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